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Former Vice Media editor allegedly tried to recruit staffers for a transnational cocaine smuggling ring

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A former Vice Media editor allegedly used the Vice Canada office as a recruiting center for a transnational cocaine smuggling venture, the National Post reports. The editor reportedly sought out young journalists and artists for the drug ring, current and former Vice employees alleged in a conversation with the National Post.

Yaroslav Pastukhov, who was the music editor of Vice Canada and went by Slava Pastuk at the time, reportedly offered each of them $10,000 so that they would carry and deliver suitcases lined with drugs from Las Vegas to Australia. According to the report, they all declined to accept the offer.

Pastukhov parted ways with Vice Media in Feb. 2016 after several employees reported concerning behavior to management; however, his reason for parting ways with Vice was never disclosed to staff. The three young individuals who made the allegations to the National Post shared in-depth, first hand accounts of what they claim happened between them and Pastukhov.

One of them was a full-time staffer, one was an intern, and the other a former intern who contributed to Vice on a freelance basis. Two of them noted that when Pastukhov allegedly offered the trip the first time around, they were under the impression that it was on an assignment for Vice, but that they didn’t initially report it to management out of fear that it would damage their working relationship.

Chris Ball, Vice Canada’s head of communications wrote in a statement to the Post: “Upon learning of these allegations in early 2016, Vice Canada took immediate and swift action to address these claims through our Human Resources department, enlisting an employment law specialist to consult throughout and engaging an outside criminal law firm to conduct an investigation on our behalf and contact the Toronto Police Service. Based on the results of the internal investigation the employee was promptly terminated on February 16th, 2016.”

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The statement continued: “Vice Canada takes allegations such as these very seriously as the safety of our employees is our first and foremost concern. In fact, our employee handbook quite clearly states that ‘the use, possession, sale, transfer, offering or furnishing of illegal drugs or illegal use of other controlled substances while on duty or on Vice premises is prohibited.'”

You can read more about the investigation here.

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‘Offered up for abuse’: Jeffrey Epstein and Charlie Rose conferred about new assistants the PBS host could sexually harass

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Disgraced former PBS host Charlie Rose and accused billionaire pedophile Jeffrey Epstein allegedly had conversations about women whom Rose should hire and whom he would then go on to sexually harass.

New York Magazine reporter Irin Carmon has a bombshell story about Epstein's call logs that show his regular interactions with multiple powerful men during a time when prosecutors say he was running a sex trafficking ring for underage girls.

Of particular interest are his calls with Rose, who was fired by PBS in 2017 after multiple women came forward to accuse him of being a serial sexual harasser.

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Florida woman hurls Trump’s racist slur at man after she gropes his wife: police

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According to a police report first published by The Smoking Gun, a woman in Florida has been arrested after groping a woman on a pleasure cruise in front of her husband and six-year-old daughter, and then telling her husband, "You should go back to the country you came from."

The defendant, Lisa Ann Matteson, reportedly appeared to be intoxicated when she grabbed her fellow passenger's buttocks and said, "Oh, it's curved and nice ... I would do you."

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When radioactive wastes aren’t radioactive wastes

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The U.S. Department of Energy wants to redefine what constitutes high-level radioactive waste, cutting corners on the disposal of some of the most dangerous and long-lasting waste byproduct on earth—reprocessed spent fuel from the nuclear defense program.

The agency announced in October 2018 plans for its reinterpretation of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), as defined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, with plans to classify waste by its hazard level and not its origin. By using the idea of a reinterpretation of a definition, the DOE may be able to circumvent Congressional oversight. And in its regulatory filing, the DOE, citing the NWPA and Atomic Energy Act of 1954, said it has the authority to “interpret” what materials are classified as high-level waste based on their radiological characteristics. That is not quite true, as Congress specifically defined high-level radioactive waste in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, and any reinterpretation of that definition should trigger a Congressional response.

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