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Top military official frets over ‘unbelievable turmoil’ in White House: ‘Sort it out soon — we’re at war’

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A top military official expressed concern over the stability of the U.S. government in the wake of Michael Flynn’s resignation as national security advisor.

Gen. Tony Thomas, head of the Special Operations Command, worried during a military conference Tuesday that the situation in Washington could cause U.S. troops to lose focus in their efforts to combat terrorism, reported the New York Times.

“Our government continues to be in unbelievable turmoil,” Thomas said. “I hope they sort it out soon, because we’re a nation at war.”

Thomas, who served in key posts in the top-secret counterterrorism unit known as Delta Force, recently took over command of SOCOM — which conducts covert missions such as unconventional warfare, counterinsurgency and psychological warfare.

Thomas insisted Special Operations Forces are “staying focused” despite the shakeups on President Donald Trump’s national security team, but he told the Times afterward that he hoped the situation would get sorted out soon.

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“As a commander, I’m concerned our government be as stable as possible,” Thomas told the newspaper.

Trump’s national security team is in disarray less than a month into his presidency, reported Bloomberg, and the agency’s acting director called an all-hands meeting for Tuesday morning.

Army Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg, the acting NSC director, and deputy K.T. McFarland were each expected to speak at that meeting.

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Trump added his chief strategist, Steve Bannon, to the National Security Council last month, in a controversial move that downgraded the joint chiefs of staff and director of national intelligence — who will attend agency meeting only when their expertise is requested.

Kellogg is among several reported candidates to succeed Flynn, who admitted that he neglected to tell Vice President Mike Pence that he might have discussed ending sanctions against Russia in a phone conversation with that nation’s ambassador.

Flynn, the former director of the defense intelligence agency under President Barack Obama, has been the subject of news reports questioning his ties to the Kremlin.

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Trump’s aides are also vetting retired Vice Admiral Robert Harward, former CIA director David Petraeus, and Robert Kimmitt as possible successors to Flynn.


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Former Fox & Friends co-host Clayton Morris flees the US as he faces two dozen lawsuits

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Facing more than two-dozen lawsuits alleging he committed real estate fraud, former "Fox & Friends Weekend" co-host Clayton Morris has reportedly fled the United States, according to the Indianapolis Star.

Morris, who previously resided in a $1.4 million home in New Jersey, moved his family to a coastal resort town in Portugal, the newspaper reported, citing a Facebook post from his wife.

Morris's wife and business partner, former MSNBC anchor Natali Morris, told the IndyStar that she and her husband plan to continue fighting the lawsuits from abroad.

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Trump defenders argued his latest tweets weren’t really racist — but he just completely undercut their arguments

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Donald Trump in coal helmet thumbs up

If you try to defend President Donald Trump, you will always end up having the rug pulled out from underneath you. It's a law of nature.

And yet, so many of the president's allies have failed to learn this simple lesson. So when Trump launched a new attack at progressive Democratic lawmakers that was one of his most obviously racist smears, inevitably, some of his defenders tried to deny the obvious truth.

His screed attacked a group of women who have come to define the left wing of the Democratic caucus, which includes Reps. Ilhan Omar (MN), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (NY), Rashida Talib (MI), and Ayanna Pressley (MA). Though only Omar is an immigrant (she was a refugee from Somalia as a child), Trump seemed to assume all four women of color weren't born in the United States, and most egregiously, he suggested they should "go back" to other countries:

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Trump is facing massive criticism for his attacks on young women of color in Congress

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US President Donald Trump came under fire from Democrats and even some members of his own Republican Party on Monday after launching an extraordinary xenophobic attack on four progressive Democratic congresswomen.

"All they do is complain," Trump told reporters at a White House event featuring products "Made in America."

"These are people that hate our country," he said of the four lawmakers. "If you're not happy here, you can leave."

Trump also accused the four first-term congresswomen -- who are of Hispanic, Arab, Somali and African American origin -- of having "love" for US "enemies like Al-Qaeda."

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