Quantcast
Connect with us

Top military official frets over ‘unbelievable turmoil’ in White House: ‘Sort it out soon — we’re at war’

Published

on

A top military official expressed concern over the stability of the U.S. government in the wake of Michael Flynn’s resignation as national security advisor.

Gen. Tony Thomas, head of the Special Operations Command, worried during a military conference Tuesday that the situation in Washington could cause U.S. troops to lose focus in their efforts to combat terrorism, reported the New York Times.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Our government continues to be in unbelievable turmoil,” Thomas said. “I hope they sort it out soon, because we’re a nation at war.”

Thomas, who served in key posts in the top-secret counterterrorism unit known as Delta Force, recently took over command of SOCOM — which conducts covert missions such as unconventional warfare, counterinsurgency and psychological warfare.

Thomas insisted Special Operations Forces are “staying focused” despite the shakeups on President Donald Trump’s national security team, but he told the Times afterward that he hoped the situation would get sorted out soon.

“As a commander, I’m concerned our government be as stable as possible,” Thomas told the newspaper.

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump’s national security team is in disarray less than a month into his presidency, reported Bloomberg, and the agency’s acting director called an all-hands meeting for Tuesday morning.

Army Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg, the acting NSC director, and deputy K.T. McFarland were each expected to speak at that meeting.

Trump added his chief strategist, Steve Bannon, to the National Security Council last month, in a controversial move that downgraded the joint chiefs of staff and director of national intelligence — who will attend agency meeting only when their expertise is requested.

ADVERTISEMENT

Kellogg is among several reported candidates to succeed Flynn, who admitted that he neglected to tell Vice President Mike Pence that he might have discussed ending sanctions against Russia in a phone conversation with that nation’s ambassador.

Flynn, the former director of the defense intelligence agency under President Barack Obama, has been the subject of news reports questioning his ties to the Kremlin.

Trump’s aides are also vetting retired Vice Admiral Robert Harward, former CIA director David Petraeus, and Robert Kimmitt as possible successors to Flynn.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘This is INSANE’: National security experts shocked by Pompeo’s saber-rattling towards Turkey

Published

on

National security experts are floored seeing the warmongering coming from Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who said Monday that he was prepared to go to war with Turkey.

“We prefer peace to war,” Pompeo told CNBC. “But in the event that kinetic action or military action is needed, you should know that President Trump is fully prepared to undertake that action.”

He didn't want to give specifics, however, saying he wanted to let the president announce things himself.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

The tangled web of Rudy Giuliani’s associations with questionable characters in the Ukraine scandal

Published

on

Washington Post political analyst Philip Bump has created a link analysis of the tangled web President Donald Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani finds himself caught in.

According to the report, Giuliani isn't only linked to Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, the two associates indicted and arrested after lunch with them a few weeks ago. Giuliani is linked to a chorus of people now outed for being involved in the Ukraine scandal.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

White House personnel chief delivers a new blow to Trump: Top DHS candidates are not legally qualified

Published

on

President Donald Trump's quest to find an acting replacement for departed Department of Homeland Security chief Kirstjen Nielsen was dealt a significant blow on Monday.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the White House personnel office chief Sean Doocey has informed the president that he doesn't believe either of his top two picks are legally qualified to hold the position.

As the Journal notes, "federal statute that governs vacancies states that acting officials in cabinet-level positions must either be next in line for a position or hold a Senate-confirmed position." Neither Ken Cuccinelli, who heads the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, nor Mark Morgan, who leads Customs and Border Protection, meet those standards, Doocey determined.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image