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Louisiana deputy marshal convicted of manslaughter in boy’s death

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A Louisiana jury convicted a deputy marshal of manslaughter and attempted manslaughter on Friday in the killing of a 6-year-old boy during a volley of gunfire after chasing his father’s car in 2015.

Derrick Stafford, 33, was found guilty by 10-2 jury vote in a Marksville, Louisiana, courtroom, more than a year after he and another deputy opened fire on Chris Few’s Kia SUV after a two-mile pursuit. Few’s son, Jeremy Mardis, 6, who was inside the vehicle, was shot and killed and Few was wounded.

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Prosecutors argued that Stafford stood a safe distance from Few’s vehicle and opened fire out of anger during the Nov. 3, 2015 incident.

Stafford “had enough and made a decision to kill a man,” prosecutor John Sinquefield told jurors during closing arguments, “and in the process he killed a 6-year-old autistic boy.”

Stafford is scheduled for sentencing next Friday when he faces up 60 years in prison

The second deputy, Norris Greenhouse Jr., also faces charges of second-degree murder and attempted second-degree murder in the shooting and is scheduled to go on trial in June.

The two deputies fired at least 18 times at Few’s car. Jeremy, who was hit at least four times, died still wearing his seatbelt in the front passenger seat. Three bullets recovered from his body matched Stafford’s .40-caliber Glock pistol, state police have said.

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Stafford’s attorney Jonathan Goins said he plans to appeal.

“One day, Mr. Stafford will see daylight again. We are happy about that,” Goins said after the verdict as Stafford’s cried nearby.

Stafford told jurors from the witness stand on Friday that he never saw the young child in the car and fired only in self-defense after Few, who’d turned into a dead-end, put his car in reverse.

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“I felt I had no choice. That’s the only reason I fired my weapon,” said Stafford, who cried on the stand while viewing photos of the boy’s body. “I had no idea a child was in the vehicle.”

The jury viewed footage of the shooting and its grisly aftermath several times during the trial. The footage was captured on the body camera of a third officer who arrived at the scene. That officer testified that he never perceived a threat.

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(Reporting by Brendan O’Brien; Editing by Robert Birsel)


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New Mexico governor warns Trump coronavirus could ‘wipe out’ tribal nations

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On Monday, ABC News reported that Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM) issued a dire warning to the Trump administration about Native American tribal nations' vulnerability to the coronavirus pandemic during a conference call between the White House and state governors.

"We're seeing incredible spikes in the Navajo Nation, and this is going to be an issue where we're going to have to figure that out and think about maybe testing and surveillance opportunities," said Grisham.

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Global lockdown tightens as coronavirus deaths mount

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Harsh lockdowns aimed at halting the march of the coronavirus pandemic extended worldwide Monday as the death toll soared past 37,500 amid new waves of US outbreaks.

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How my dad survived the 1918 flu — and predicted the decline of America

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by William Astore 

My dad was born in 1917. Somehow, he survived the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918-1919, but an outbreak of whooping cough in 1923 claimed his baby sister, Clementina. One of my dad’s first memories was seeing his sister’s tiny white casket. Another sister was permanently marked by scarlet fever. In 1923, my dad was hit by a car and spent two weeks in a hospital with a fractured skull as well as a lacerated thumb. His immigrant parents had no medical insurance, but the driver of the car gave his father $50 toward the medical bills. The only lasting effect was the scar my father carried for the rest of his life on his right thumb.

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