Quantcast
Connect with us

‘Things have changed’: White supremacists cite Trump in bomb threat targeting Muslim students

Published

on

EV building at Concordia University being evacuated (Twitter / Elias Abboud)

On Wednesday morning, two buildings at Concordia University’s downtown campus in Montreal were evacuated after several media outlets received an email threatening to target Muslim students at the college by setting off bombs, the Montreal Gazette reported.

Montreal police are investigating the matter, and police spokesperson Benoit Boisselle said the department does not yet know “whether the threat is founded.” The email making the threat was written by a group that called itself the Council of Conservative Citizens of Canada (C4).

ADVERTISEMENT

The Council of Conservative Citizens (CCC) is a U.S.-based white supremacist group that was founded in 1985 as a spinoff of the White Citizens Councils of the 1950s and 1960s that fought school desegregation, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center.

The group’s mission states an opposition to “all efforts to mix the races of mankind,” and was described by the Atlantic as the “largest white-supremacist group in the nation.” The group has also been active in Canada and was cited in Dylann Roof’s manifesto, the white supremacist behind the 2015 Charleston church massacre.

This week, one of the buildings at Concordia that was targeted by the bomb threat is scheduled to hold an Islamic Awareness Week between Monday and Thursday.

The email from the Council of Conservative Citizens of Canada included threats to “detonate once per day, a small artisanal amateur explosive devices,” targeting two floors of the Hall building and one floor of the Engineering, Computer Science and Visual Arts building, both of which were evacuated on Wednesday morning.

The specific locations were described in the email as “where Muslims hang out,” and the sender clarified that the bombs are “not meant to kill anybody. The only aim is to injure some Muslim students.” According to Global News, the email demands a halt of “religious activities of all kinds on campus.”

ADVERTISEMENT

McGill University reportedly received a similar message, according to CBC. “The campus community radio station at McGill University — was among the media outlets to receive the letter threatening Muslim students at Concordia,” CBC reported.

“Since we will [spread] our fight to McGill too, we at C4 decided to give you a heads up of the emergency situation at Concordia University,” the email read, and was signed by an individual who self-identified as the “C4 co-ordinator.”

“Things have changed,” now that President Donald Trump has taken office in the U.S., according to the email. The email comes as 101 bomb threats have been recorded, targeting Jewish institutions across the United States in 33 states so far.

ADVERTISEMENT

Classes at Concordia have been cancelled until 6 p.m. local time. A statement on the school’s website noted, “Concordia is now cooperating with police who are now on-site investigating a potential threat in these buildings.”

 

ADVERTISEMENT

See below for what appears to be a copy of the email sent by the group.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump’s efforts to undo the election are facing resistance from these Republicans in key battleground states

Published

on

Critics of President Donald Trump — from liberals and progressives to right-wing Never Trump conservatives — are slamming Republicans in Congress who refuse to publicly acknowledge Joe Biden as president-elect or speak out against Trump's election-related lawsuits. But New York Times reporters Peter Baker and Kathleen Gray, in an article published on November 28, emphasize that in key battleground states, some of the people who have refused to indulge Team Trump's legal challenges and bogus election fraud claims are Republicans.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump’s team files fifth demand for Georgia to audit their ballot signatures as their campaign to overturn the election fizzles

Published

on

President Donald Trump's campaign has filed its fifth demand for the state of Georgia to audit the signatures on ballots.

The statement from the Trump team said that the "Georgia secretary of state should perform an immediate audit of the signatures on all absentee ballot applications and absentee ballot envelopes received for the Nov. 3 General Election. The Trump Campaign estimates that between 38,250 and 45,626 illegal votes from absentee ballots alone were cast in the state of Georgia -- far beyond the Biden-Harris ticket's current margin of 12,670 votes."

https://twitter.com/JulesJester/status/1333460202948075526

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Supreme Court hearing gets awkward as conservative Alito runs roughshod over chief justice Roberts

Published

on

President Trump is pressing the U.S. Supreme Court to allow him to exclude undocumented immigrants from the census count -- a move that goes against more than 200 years of practice where non-citizen residents, even those in the U.S. illegally, were among those counted.

While questioning New York Solicitor General Barbara Underwood, conservative Justice Samuel Alito said that the prospect of submitting two documents, one detailing census numbers of every person inside the U.S. and another detailing numbers that exclude undocumented immigrants inside the U.S. "seems like a totally meaningless formality."

Continue Reading