Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump budget plan to propose major cuts for State Dept., EPA: NY Times

Published

on

A budget proposal to be released by U.S. President Donald Trump on Thursday includes deep cuts for the State Department and Environmental Protection Agency as his administration seeks to raise military spending, the New York Times said on Wednesday.

The budget plan for fiscal 2018 will call for cuts of 28 percent for the State Department and 31 percent for the Environmental Protection Agency, the Times reported, citing congressional staff members familiar with the plan.

ADVERTISEMENT

It will also propose a big reduction in the State Department’s Food for Peace program and the elimination of a Transportation Department program that subsidizes flights to rural U.S. airports, the Times said.

Trump’s budget proposals include cuts in federal government agencies that have been targeted by Republican Party politicians for decades but historically protected by Congress which under law holds the federal purse strings.

His administration is seeking to boost military spending by $54 billion and seek cuts of the same size in non-defense programs. Early drafts described by government officials call for dramatic cuts at some agencies.

“They’re really going to be cutting into bone,” said Kenneth Baer, a former associate director at the Office of Management and Budget who helped draft President Barack Obama’s first four budgets.

ADVERTISEMENT

The document will begin months of debate on government spending, with Democrats and moderate Republicans worried the budget could force tough decisions on popular programs such as aid for disabled children and hot meals for the elderly, and conservatives pushing for more cuts down the line.

New administrations typically submit to Congress what is known as a “skinny budget”, a broad outline of spending proposals, in their initial months in office, with lengthy volumes of fiscal plans and projections following a couple of months later.

But the Trump budget for the fiscal year that begins on Oct. 1, 2017 may be more truncated than usual, said three budget experts interviewed by Reuters.

ADVERTISEMENT

The document is expected to look only at one narrow piece of the budget: “discretionary” programs that are subject to renewal every year and not the massive “entitlement” programs such as the Social Security retirement program and the Medicare and Medicaid health programs.

“This one appears as though it will be one of the skinniest budgets of recent memory. Possibly emaciated,” said Maya MacGuineas, president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

Social programs such as Social Security and Medicare account for the majority of overall U.S. federal government costs. Trump pledged to protect the two programs during the campaign.

ADVERTISEMENT

“If they put out a budget as skinny as advertised, it might not really tell us a whole lot about the president’s overall budget and the direction of fiscal policy,” said Robert Bixby, executive director of the Concord Coalition, a nonpartisan budget reform advocacy group.

COULD FACE RESISTANCE

The “skinny budget” is not expected to address other potentially expensive promises Trump made during his campaign.

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump wants to boost infrastructure spending while cutting taxes. Although he has not given details on how or when that would happen, the pledges worry Romina Boccia, a fiscal policy expert at the conservative Heritage Foundation. “You could blow up the deficit even more,” she said.

If Trump sticks with his campaign spending promises but decides to make a bigger push to rein in the deficit, more cuts could be in store for programs such as food assistance for the poor, college Pell Grants for the poor, and some income assistance for poor senior citizens, said Sharon Parrott, senior fellow at the Center of Budget and Policy Priorities.

“That’s what’s left,” Parrot said in an interview.

ADVERTISEMENT

The budget blueprint represents Trump’s priorities for government spending in the coming fiscal year but it will ultimately be up to Congress to decide how to allocate funds.

Even though Trump’s Republicans control both the House of Representatives and the Senate, the budget could face resistance. Some moderate Republicans have already expressed unease with some of the proposed spending cuts.

Trump’s “skinny budget” will also make funding requests for the remaining months of the current fiscal year.

ADVERTISEMENT

The White House is expected to ask Congress for additional money for the current fiscal year for waging combat operations abroad and for starting to build a wall on the southwestern U.S. border with Mexico.

As long as increases in military spending are offset with cuts elsewhere for 2018, keeping the deficit in check, Republican Representative Steve Pearce said he was willing to wait patiently for broader fiscal belt-tightening down the road.

    “We’re playing a very long game here in the debt and deficit,” Pearce said in an interview.

ADVERTISEMENT

(Reporting by Richard Cowan and Roberta Rampton; Editing by Peter Cooney and Nick Tattersall)

Enjoy this piece?

… then let us make a small request. Like you, we here at Raw Story believe in the power of progressive journalism — and we’re investing in investigative reporting as other publications give it the ax. Raw Story readers power David Cay Johnston’s DCReport, which we've expanded to keep watch in Washington. We’ve exposed billionaire tax evasion and uncovered White House efforts to poison our water. We’ve revealed financial scams that prey on veterans, and legal efforts to harm workers exploited by abusive bosses. We’ve launched a weekly podcast, “We’ve Got Issues,” focused on issues, not tweets. And unlike other news outlets, we’ve decided to make our original content free. But we need your support to do what we do.

Raw Story is independent. You won’t find mainstream media bias here. We’re not part of a conglomerate, or a project of venture capital bros. From unflinching coverage of racism, to revealing efforts to erode our rights, Raw Story will continue to expose hypocrisy and harm. Unhinged from billionaires and corporate overlords, we fight to ensure no one is forgotten.

We need your support to keep producing quality journalism and deepen our investigative reporting. Every reader contribution, whatever the amount, makes a tremendous difference. Invest with us in the future. Make a one-time contribution to Raw Story Investigates, or click here to become a subscriber. Thank you. Click to donate by check.

Enjoy this piece?

… then let us make a small request. Like you, we here at Raw Story believe in the power of progressive journalism — and we’re investing in investigative reporting as other publications give it the ax. Raw Story readers power David Cay Johnston’s DCReport, which we've expanded to keep watch in Washington. We’ve exposed billionaire tax evasion and uncovered White House efforts to poison our water. We’ve revealed financial scams that prey on veterans, and efforts to harm workers exploited by abusive bosses. We’ve launched a weekly podcast, “We’ve Got Issues,” focused on issues, not tweets. Unlike other news sites, we’ve decided to make our original content free. But we need your support to do what we do.

Raw Story is independent. You won’t find mainstream media bias here. We’re not part of a conglomerate, or a project of venture capital bros. From unflinching coverage of racism, to revealing efforts to erode our rights, Raw Story will continue to expose hypocrisy and harm. Unhinged from corporate overlords, we fight to ensure no one is forgotten.

We need your support to keep producing quality journalism and deepen our investigative reporting. Every reader contribution, whatever the amount, makes a tremendous difference. Invest with us in the future. Make a one-time contribution to Raw Story Investigates, or click here to become a subscriber. Thank you.



Report typos and corrections to: [email protected]. Send news tips to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Has anything changed since Burning Man’s sex assault and labor issues were exposed?

Published

on

The last weekend in August marks the start of Burning Man, a week-long, festival in the Nevada desert consisting of freewheeling performance art, fanciful costumes, and a lot of drugs. The anarchic party with more than 50,000 attendees constitutes a pilgrimage for many attendees, lured by the promise of leaving the “default world” behind in exchange for a transformative or even spiritual experience.

This article originally appeared at Salon.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Truckers are facing a ‘bloodbath’ in their industry — and it’s turning many in the pro-Trump group against him: report

Published

on

Truckers are numerous, conservative, and hurting. And despite their widespread support for Donald Trump’s candidacy in 2016, a new report from Business Insider suggests the pain in the industry might be turning these workers away from the president.

The political trends in trucking are not insignificant. According to the American Trucking Associations, there were an estimated 3.5 million truck drivers in 2018. RTS Financial has found that there are 7.4 million jobs total “tied to the trucking industry.” And Business Insider reported that nearly 90 percent of truckers are registered voters, higher than the general population.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

WATCH: Trump’s collusion with Russia is now a topic for impeachment — along with obstruction and racism

Published

on

President Donald Trump's interactions with Russia are now a topic of the impeachment investigation.

"There was an important development in support for impeachment proceedings in the House of Representatives today," MSNBC anchor Lawrence O'Donnell reported Tuesday. "Important both in who the new support comes from and what that support is based on."

"Congresswoman Lauren Underwood of Illinois is one of the freshmen Democrats who flipped a Republican district last year in winning her election. She brings the total number of House Democrats supporting impeachment now to 126 -- a majority of the Democrats' 235 members of the House," he explained.

Continue Reading
 
 

Thank you for whitelisting Raw Story!

As a special thank you, from now until August 31st, we're offering you a discounted rate of $5.99/month to subscribe and get ad-free access. We're honored to have you as a reader. Thank you. :) —Elias, Membership Coordinator
LEARN MORE
close-link
close-image