Quantcast
Connect with us

US tourist killed in London would not have borne ill feelings toward attacker: family

Published

on

The family of U.S. tourist Kurt Cochran who was killed in last week’s assault on the British parliament said on Monday he would not have borne any ill feelings toward the attacker.

Cochran, 54, and his wife, Melissa, were in Europe to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary and had been due to return to the United States the day after the attack took place last Wednesday.

ADVERTISEMENT

He was killed when a British man, Khalid Masood, plowed down pedestrians as he sped along Westminster Bridge before fatally stabbing an unarmed policeman at the parliament building.

“We know that Kurt wouldn’t bear ill feelings toward anyone and we can draw strength as a family from that,” said family spokesman Clint Payne at a news conference.

“His whole life was an example of focusing on the positive. Not pretending that negative things don’t exist but not living our life in the negative – that’s what we choose to do.”

Payne said the family had been through a humbling and difficult experience but had “felt the love of so many people.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Three others were also killed in the assault and around 50 people were injured, making it Britain’s deadliest attack since the 2005 London underground bombings. Masood was shot dead.

Cochran’s wife suffered a broken leg and rib and a cut to her head.

The couple were visiting Melissa Cochran’s parents, who are missionaries in London for the Salt Lake City-based Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), also known as the Mormon church, LDS spokesman Eric Hawkins said in an email.

ADVERTISEMENT

Kurt Cochran’s most recent photo uploads on his Facebook page depicted scenes from their vacation in Europe, including one of him smiling while holding a large glass of Belgian beer.

(Reporting by Kate Holton; editing by Stephen Addison)


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Zuckerberg meets Trump, senators; nixes breaking up Facebook

Published

on

Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg met Thursday with US President Donald Trump and members of Congress on a political reconnaissance mission to Washington, where he rejected calls to break up the world's biggest social network.

Zuckerberg's visit comes as Facebook faces a myriad of regulatory and legal questions surrounding issues like competition, digital privacy, censorship and transparency in political advertising.

A Facebook spokesman said discussions were focusing in part on future internet regulation.

Senate Democrat Mark Warner, one of the lawmakers who has taken the lead in Washington on digital security, signaled they gave Zuckerberg an earful.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Watch Rudy Giuliani’s stunning confession that he has been pressuring Ukraine officials for dirt on Biden

Published

on

Attorney for the president Rudy Giuliani gave a combative, belligerent and downright incoherent interview on CNN Thursday evening, raving about a ballooning scandal involving Donald Trump and Ukraine.

Giuliani and Trump have apparently been pressuring the country to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, a probe that could help the president’s re-election campaign. That massive scandal had been unfurling on its own for months, but it blew up Thursday when multiple reports revealed that a mysteriously suppressed whistleblower complaint in the intelligence community reportedly concerns Trump’s conduct and the country of Ukraine.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Israel scientists unveil appearance of ancient human relative

Published

on

We know what Neanderthals looked like. Now, thanks to ancient DNA, Israeli scientists have unveiled the appearance of another of our ancient relatives.

Very few clues exist about the lives of the Denisovans -- cousins of Neanderthals -- who went extinct around 50,000 years ago: three teeth, a pinky bone, and a lower jaw.

But that was enough for researchers at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem to draw conclusions on their appearance.

The mission was challenging, according to Professor Liran Carmel, one of two scientists leading the study.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image