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Right-wing bloggers rip White House media event: ‘They packed us in a room and made us fight for scraps’

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Conservative media figures were frustrated by their treatment by the Trump administration after they were invited to the White House.

About 30 reporters, editors and radio hosts were invited to the White House on Monday night for a background briefing with President Donald Trump and some of his top aides, but they complained afterward that the event was poorly planned, reported The Hill.

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The group was asked to turn over their cell phones before meeting with White House officials in the Roosevelt Room, which is used for viewing classified information.

The meeting was supposed to be off-the-record, which means they couldn’t attribute quotes gathered during the event, but were told after turning over their phones that they could quote Trump and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross.

That led to a mad scramble to retrieve phones from the lockers where they were stored to report that Trump would institute new tariffs on some lumber imported from Canada.

“This is what happens when Never Trump, low-energy, Jeb Bush staffers infiltrate Donald Trump’s White House,” one source told The Hill. “The incompetence by the White House press staff does not serve the president’s interests well.”

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Conservative media outlets have accused Trump and his White House of a double standard.

They say the administration complains about the mainstream media in public, but Trump routinely calls reporters from those outlets and meets with them for exclusive interviews.

“They packed us in a room and made us fight for scraps,” one source told The Hill. “It’s not exclusive if you give it to 40 journalists and then make us fight over it. Did [New York Times reporters] Maggie Haberman or Glenn Thrush have to surrender their cell phones for their interview? The White House would be better served if they called on us one by one like he does with them.”

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2020 Election

Will Trump peacefully vacate the Oval Office if he loses the presidential election in 2020? A lesson from 1800

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As primary season heats up in the United States, the Democrats are anxiously debating the best path to unseat Donald Trump in 2020. But the question of how to beat Trump is perhaps less urgent than the issue of whether he will accept defeat.

Trump has already questioned his loss of the 2016 popular vote with baseless accusations of voter fraud. He has also repeatedly toyed with the idea of extending his presidency beyond the eight-year limit enshrined in the U.S. Constitution, even trumpeting Jerry Falwell Jr.’s assertion that his first term be extended by two years to compensate for the Russia investigation. Perhaps most ominously, Trump’s former lawyer Michael Cohen warned while testifying before the House Oversight Committee in February 2019:

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Something is killing galaxies — and science is on the case

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In the most extreme regions of the universe, galaxies are being killed. Their star formation is being shut down and astronomers want to know why.

The first ever Canadian-led large project on one of the world’s leading telescopes is hoping to do just that. The new program, called the Virgo Environment Traced in Carbon Monoxide survey (VERTICO), is investigating, in brilliant detail, how galaxies are killed by their environment.

As VERTICO’s principal investigator, I lead a team of 30 experts that are using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to map the molecular hydrogen gas, the fuel from which new stars are made, at high resolution across 51 galaxies in our nearest galaxy cluster, called the Virgo Cluster.

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Inside the Trump administration’s chaotic dismantling of the Federal Land Agency

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Early this month, workers at the Washington headquarters of the Bureau of Land Management gathered to discuss a Trump administration plan that would force some 200 people to uproot their lives or find other jobs.

With a vague plan that keeps changing as officials describe it — and no guarantees that Congress would fully fund their relocations — the employees were being detailed to distant locations in the West like Grand Junction, Colorado, and Reno, Nevada. Many career staff saw the move as part of a wider Trump administration effort to drive federal employees out of their jobs. Acting White House chief of staff Mike Mulvaney has described that approach as a “wonderful way to streamline government.”

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