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Trump advisers to meet Tuesday to discuss Paris climate agreement

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Advisers to President Donald Trump will meet on Tuesday to discuss whether to recommend that he withdraw the United States from the Paris climate accord, a White House official said on Monday.

The accord, agreed on by nearly 200 countries in Paris in 2015, aims to limit planetary warming in part by slashing carbon dioxide and other emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Under the pact, the United States committed to reducing its emissions by 26 to 28 percent from 2005 levels by 2025.

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Trump has said the United States should “cancel” the deal, but he has been mostly quiet on the issue since he was elected last November.

Environmental groups want Washington to remain in the Paris agreement, even if the new administration weakens U.S. pledges.

A White House official said Trump’s aides would “discuss the options, with the goal of providing a recommendation to the president about the path forward.”

The meeting comes before a summit of the Group of Seven wealthy nations in late May, the deadline for the White House to take a position.

White House officials, led by the National Economic Council, have recently been asking publicly traded energy companies for advice on whether to stay in the agreement.

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Peabody Energy has consulted with White House officials, and Cloud Peak Energy Inc confirmed to Reuters it had told White House advisers it was in its interests for the United States to remain in the agreement to ensure there was a global role for high-efficiency coal plants.

On Monday, liquified natural gas exporter Cheniere Energy sent a letter to George David Banks, who handles international energy issues at the NEC, to recommend remaining in the Paris agreement so “the United States can leverage competitive advantages in natural gas and energy technology.”

The advisers expected to attend Tuesday’s meeting include Energy Secretary Rick Perry and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt.

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Perry, a former Texas governor, at his confirmation hearings in January softened a previous position that the science behind climate change was “phony.”

Last week, Pruitt, a former Oklahoma attorney general, said the United States should exit the agreement because it was a “bad deal” for the country.

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Justin Guay, climate program officer for the Packard Foundation, said countries like China and India would continue to shift toward clean energy even if the United States retreated, adding: “It is most important that the U.S. stays at the table.”

(Reporting by Steve Holland and Valerie Volcovici; Editing by Andrew Hay and Peter Cooney)


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Legal expert admits he was wrong to argue Trump wasn’t the worst president in history

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Fordham Law School Prof. Jed Shugerman confessed on Twitter that he was wrong, President Donald Trump really is the worst president in American history.

He explained that in the past he's tried to explain that previous presidents like Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan and Andrew Jackson were the worst American presidents given what they did to persist the Civil War, the genocide of Native Americans and other acts. They were "openly siding [with] white supremacy and causing a civil war," which he said he thought was "far worse than anything Trump could do."

https://twitter.com/jedshug/status/938449020233580544

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Trump’s dangerous mental condition grows worse as America faces devastating crises: Yale psychiatrist

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A nation most afflicted with a mental health problem is the least likely to address it.  I am speaking of the mental health, or lack thereof, of the president.  His psychological impairments have been deadly through action and inaction, and are now promoting police brutality through pronouncements such as, “when the looting starts, the shooting starts,” while marking protesters as “thugs”.

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Independent autopsy finds George Floyd was killed by asphyxia — contradicting medical examiner

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On Monday, George Floyd's family released the results of the independent autopsy into his death following a police officer kneeling on his neck for over eight minutes.

According to USA TODAY's Nicquel Terry Ellis, the report concludes Floyd's death was "homicide caused by asphyxia due to neck and back compression that led to a lack of blood flow to the brain."

BREAKING: Independent autopsy finds that George Floyd's death "was homicide caused by asphyxia due to neck and back compression that led to a lack of blood flow to the brain."

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