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WATCH: Van Jones dismantles Lord’s bizarre claim that sanctuary cities could become ‘abortion-free zones’

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CNN’s Van Jones schooled Jeffrey Lord over Donald Trump’s executive order revoking federal funds for sanctuary cities—a move a federal judge in California blocked on Tuesday,

Lord was arguing it’s “interesting to hear my liberal friends think that this is a victory” because “apparently … a mayor of any city could declare—let’s say they’re pro-life—they could declare their city to be an abortion-free zone, an abortion-free sanctuary.”

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Jones pointed out that’s “not a good example,” reminding Lord “there’s a constitutionally protected right that a woman has [to have an abortion].”

“The reason that mayors don’t want to be turned into arms and agents of the federal government … is because you have whole communities who would just stop cooperating with law enforcement or may not be willing to come forward,” Jones explained, noting mayors need to be able to determine “what they’re going to prioritize.”

“Where were you when the Justice Department went into Ferguson, Missouri?” Lord asked Jones, who appeared shocked by Lord’s challenged.

“What do you mean where was I?” Lord replied. “I was right there in Ferguson getting tear gassed with half of everybody else at CNN.”

“And you wanted the federal government to come in and stop it!” Lord shot back.

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Jones tried to explain that he wanted the Justice Department to enforce the Constitutionally-protected rights of a free assembly and press, but Lord cut him off.

“When there’s a cause you favor, you want the federal government to clamp down. When there’s a cause that you don’t favor, you want the federal government to butt out!” Lord charged.

“It’s actually not true,” Jones said. “You have a Constitutional right as an American citizen to, for instance, choose abortion. That’s actually been litigated.”

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“The federal government should defend civil and Constitutional rights, that’s part of its role, but it should not deputize every law enforcement agent in the country to do its bidding,” Jones added.

Lord dismissed Jones for “being selective, as my liberal friends often are.”

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Watch the video below, via CNN:


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2020 Election

We are witnessing the birth of a movement — and the downfall of a president

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They almost always begin to right wrongs: illegitimate wars; decades of discrimination on the grounds of gender or racial or sexual identity; killings of innocents by police or gun-toting lunatics; oppression by governments wielding unequal laws; the deeply embedded legacy of centuries of racism.

This article first appeared in Salon.

They are imperfect. Arising out of rage, they can be unfocused, inchoate, contradictory. Protesting violence, they often involve violence. Protesting oppression, they sometimes oppress by destroying public spaces, small businesses, even entire neighborhoods.

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COVID-19

COVID-19 research scandal: Unwanted diversion during pandemic

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The first research scandal of the coronavirus pandemic has created unnecessary distraction around the politically divisive drug hydroxychloroquine, scientists say, as questions swirl around the tiny health care company at the center of the affair.

On Thursday, most of the authors of major studies that appeared in The Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) retracted their work and issued apologies, saying they could no longer vouch for their data after the firm that supplied it -- Chicago-based Surgisphere -- refused to be audited.

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Marriott ceases Cuban operations after new Trump sanctions

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Marriott has been ordered by the US Treasury Department to close its Four Points Sheraton hotel in Havana by the end of August and abandon plans to open others in Cuba, a spokeswoman for the American hotel group told AFP on Friday.

"We entered the Cuban market in 2016, with permission from the US government," the spokeswoman said.

"Our operating license was reviewed and renewed in 2018. We have recently received notice that the government-issued license will not be renewed, forcing Marriott to cease operations in Cuba."

Marriott's entry into the Cuban market came during the administration of US president Barack Obama, a Democrat.

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