Quantcast
Connect with us

Canada cyber-spy agency expects hacktivist attacks in 2019 vote

Published

on

 Canada’s electronic spy agency said on Friday it was “very likely” that hackers will try to influence Canada’s 2019 elections and it planned to advise political parties next week on how to guard against cyber threats.

The Communications Security Establishment (CSE) agency said it had not detected any nation-state attempts to interfere in prior Canadian elections but saw risk from hacktivists.

ADVERTISEMENT

CSE said Canada’s 2015 federal election, which brought Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberals to power, was targeted by “low-sophistication cyber threat activity” that did not affect the outcome of the election, according to a report it released on Friday.

“CSE will be offering cyber advice and guidance to parliamentarians and to Canada’s political parties,” CSE chief Greta Bossenmaier told a news conference. “Cyber security is a team imperative; no one organization can go it alone,” she added.

Worries about interference in democratic processes have come to the fore amid allegations of Russian meddling in the U.S. presidential election last November and the French election in May.

U.S. intelligence agencies concluded last year that Russia hacked and leaked Democratic Party emails as part of an effort to tilt the presidential election in favor of Donald Trump, something Russia denies.

A British intelligence agency in March told political parties to protect themselves against potential cyber attacks, while the French government in March dropped plans to let its citizens abroad vote electronically in this month’s legislative elections because of concern about the risk of cyber attacks.

ADVERTISEMENT

CSE said federal political parties, politicians and the media are more vulnerable to cyber threats than elections themselves, given that federal elections are largely paper-based.

Cyber security lawyer Imran Ahmed of Miller Thomson said engaging with political parties was “a good first step” but the spy agency should have already had a plan in place including expected standards for political parties to meet.

“We’re two years away from 2019 and there’s no timeline for what the next steps will be,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

CSE said it expects some hacktivist efforts in 2019 will be well-planned, with targets ranging from voter suppression and stealing party information to trying to discredit candidates.

(Reporting by Leah Schnurr in Ottawa and Alastair Sharp in Toronto; Editing by Phil Berlowitz)

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

CNN

CNN conservative zaps every Trump supporters’ argument against impeachment

Published

on

Republican-turned-Independent David Gergen served in four presidential administrations, two of which were impeached. When he heard one of President Donald Trump's shills on CNN Wednesday evening, he was quick to flatten the argument.

Scott Jennings argued that what Democrats were doing was unprecedented, but CNN commentator Kirsten Powers said that former President Bill Clinton was nearly thrown out of office for lying about an affair, something she argued was far less important than extorting a foreign power to sway a presidential election.

Continue Reading

Facebook

Seth Meyers flattens Trump’s latest impeachment defense tactic — ‘slurring like a lunatic’ during rallies

Published

on

Late-night comedian Seth Meyers observed that most people who were inches from being fired from their job would try and prove that they should remain. President Donald Trump, however, has taken a different path, "slurring like a lunatic while throwing in some of his trademark sexism."

Meyers played a clip of Trump's rally where he went after everything from admitting he demanded the Ukraine president say what he asked and an allegation that there'd be windmills all over the country under Hillary Clinton. Trump previously alleged that wind energy is dangerous because the windmills cause ear cancer. After an attack on Beto O'Rourke, Trump turned to Elizabeth Warren, who he said, "opened her fresh mouth."

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Rachel Maddow wonders if Putin told Trump Seoul was nowhere near North Korea to mess with him

Published

on

MSNBC host Rachel Maddow was flabbergasted by the recent revelation that Trump thought he could displace an entire South Korean city so that the 2,000 year-old capital would be safer. To make matters worse, President Donald Trump asked Russian President Vladimir Putin what he wanted the U.S. leader to do with North Korea.

The host compared the move to what it would be like to move the entirety of New York City, which has a smaller population than Seoul.

Continue Reading