Quantcast
Connect with us

Could Donald Trump’s base finally be turning on the president?

Published

on

Wesley Easterling took him at his word. Like so many of his neighbors, Easterling relies on Medicaid and food stamps to provide for his wife and daughter. His Kentucky county is among the poorest in the country. When he cast his ballot for Donald Trump in the 2016 election, he never imagined the president would gut essential federal assistance programs.

“He had a kind of charisma about him, something different,” Easterling told CNN. “He played me for a fool.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Fellow Trump voters, particularly those in rural counties where his proposed budget cuts would wreak the most havoc, increasingly feel the same. As of May 31, the president’s approval rating sits at 39.1 percent against a disapproval rating of 54.9 percent, according to FiveThirtyEight. If he was profoundly unpopular in March, Trump is now plumbing new depths.

More revealing is new data suggesting the president’s bedrock of support is beginning to crumble. Nate Silver argues that his base is shrinking, citing a weighted average of several polls indicating that the percentage of American voters who strongly support the president has dipped from 30 in February to 21 or 22 in late May. At this juncture in his presidency, Barack Obama had the firm backing of 45 percent of the electorate. Meanwhile, the percentage of voters who strongly disapprove of Trump’s performance has surged from the mid-30s to 44.1 percent over the same timespan. “If you look beneath the surface of Trump’s approval ratings,” Silver writes, “you find not hidden strength but greater weakness than the topline numbers imply.”

Just ask Krista Shockey of Waverly, Ohio. It wasn’t until the administration announced its latest budget plan that the Trump voter and retiree understood all she had to lose—and the magnitude of her error. Shockey receives $700 monthly in disability payments through Supplemental Security Income; it is her lone financial stream. Under Trump’s proposal, the program would be dramatically scaled back. “There’s no way I could go back to work,” she told CNN. “I’ve got a lot of problems. I’m crippled in my knees, feet, back and hands.”

Like Shockey, Trump supporter and Union County mayor Michael Williams was stunned by the president’s about-face on social services and the severity of his proposed cuts. Williams’ Tennessee constituency has a median income of $37,000 and they rely on programs like the Appalachian Regional Commission to help stay afloat. If federal dollars dry up, the state is unlikely to provide necessary grants for public works. In an interview with Politico, Williams confessed that when he first learned of the Trump team’s latest budget, “[he thought] ‘Oh my God, I don’t know if they really thought this through.'”

Yet for every Wesley Easterling, Krista Shockey and Michael Williams, there’s a Scott Seitz of McDonald, Ohio. A two-time Obama voter, he claims he switched parties because Trump spoke to the one issue that mattered most to Seitz: jobs. Seitz’s family has succumbed to the white working-class plagues of heroin addiction, unemployment and single parenthood. While he insists he would have “voted for Bernie Sanders in a heartbeat,” he’s still willing to give the country’s scandal-plagued president a chance. “We put him in, and we will hold him accountable,” he told Vanity Fair.

ADVERTISEMENT

Until Trump proves an unequivocal liability to the Republican Party, such a promise seems unlikely to be kept any time soon.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

BUSTED: Trump’s new spy chief worked for foreign politician the US accused of corruption

Published

on

by Isaac Arnsdorf

President Donald Trump’s new acting intelligence director, Richard Grenell, used to do consulting work on behalf of an Eastern European oligarch who is now a fugitive and was recently barred from entering the U.S. under anti-corruption sanctions imposed last month by the State Department.

In 2016, Grenell wrote several articles defending the oligarch, a Moldovan politician named Vladimir Plahotniuc, but did not disclose that he was being paid, according to records and interviews. Grenell also did not register under the Foreign Agents Registration Act, which generally requires people to disclose work in the U.S. on behalf of foreign politicians.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Rosie O’Donnell hilariously responds to attacks from ‘demented liar’ Donald Trump

Published

on

President Donald Trump lashed out at Rosie O'Donnell during a campaign rally in Las Vegas on Friday.

During his third rally in as many days, Trump alleged that O'Donnell had committed crimes.

O'Donnell, who had been friendly with Trump before he began publicly feuding with her, responded to the news on Twitter.

fuck off u demented liar #TrumpRussiaCollusion https://t.co/GJIGne4WI7

— ROSIE (@Rosie) February 21, 2020

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Bernie Sanders responds to report that Russia is intervening to boost his campaign

Published

on

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) urged Russia to stay out of the upcoming 2020 election in response to a new Washington Post article, which reported Friday that the Democratic frontrunner has been briefed by U.S. officials that the foreign government is trying to boost his candidacy.

“I don’t care, frankly, who Putin wants to be president,” Sanders told the outlet. “My message to Putin is clear: stay out of American elections, and as president I will make sure that you do."

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image