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Intel chiefs privately confirm what they wouldn’t tell Senate panel: Trump asked them to refute Russia collusion

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Dan Coats and Mike Rogers

Two of the top U.S. intelligence officials have told special counsel Robert Mueller and Senate investigators that President Donald Trump asked them to publicly disprove claims that his campaign colluded with Russia.

Dan Coats, the director of national intelligence, and Adm. Mike Rogers, the director of the national security agency, went further in private and separate meetings with investigators in describing the president’s actions than they did in public congressional hearings earlier this month, reported CNN.

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Sources told the network that both officials were surprised that Trump would suggest that they publicly declare he wasn’t involved in election collusion.

Both Coats and Rogers told investigators that the Trump’s request made them feel odd and uncomfortable, but neither official believed the president had given them orders to interfere with the Russia investigation.

The closed-door meetings are classified, but both Democratic and Republican sources provided some details about them to CNN.

Then-FBI director James Comey had privately told the president he was not under investigation, before he was fired, and one source told CNN that Coats and Rogers told investigators that Trump wanted them to say the same thing in public.

Neither official believed Trump was pushing them to do something they did not want to do, but neither Coats or Rogers acted on his suggestion.

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The Washington Post first reported last month that Trump met with Coats and Rogers in March to seek their assistance in pushing back against the Russia probe after Comey confirmed the FBI was investigating links between the Republican’s campaign and the Kremlin during the election.

Senators from both parties were frustrated June 7 when neither Coats or Rogers would tell them what the president had said during those meetings.

A congressional source told CNN that Coats and Rogers had asked the White House whether those conversations were protected by executive privilege, but they never received an answer before their testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

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They were more forthcoming during the private sessions with investigators, and Rogers even turned over a memo documenting his March conversation with Trump, sources said.

That one-page memo, written by his deputy Richard Ledgett, contains few details, unlike a memo created by Comey about his private meeting with Trump.

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Moon may be richer in water than thought — and it could help propel humans farther from earth

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There may be far more water on the Moon than previously thought, according to two studies published Monday raising the tantalising prospect that astronauts on future space missions could find refreshment -- and maybe even fuel -- on the lunar surface.

The Moon was believed to be bone dry until around a decade ago when a series of findings suggested that our nearest celestial neighbour has traces of water trapped in the surface.

Two new studies published in Nature Astronomy on Monday suggest there could be much more water than previously thought, including ice stored in permanently shadowed "cold traps" at lunar polar regions.

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Asymptomatic coronaagvirus sufferers lose antibodies sooner: study

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Asymptomatic coronavirus sufferers appear to lose detectable antibodies sooner than people who have exhibited Covid-19 symptoms, according to one of the biggest studies of its kind in Britain published on Tuesday.

The findings by Imperial College London and market research firm Ipsos Mori also suggest the loss of antibodies was slower in 18–24 year-olds compared to those aged 75 and over.

Overall, samples from hundreds of thousands of people across England between mid-June and late September showed the prevalence of virus antibodies fell by more than a quarter.

The research, commissioned by the British government and published Tuesday by Imperial, indicates people's immune response to Covid-19 reduces over time following infection.

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2020 Election

Early voting to be hit by heavy rain and flooding as Hurricane Zeta barrels towards the Gulf Coast

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Hurricane Zeta is expected to make landfall near Louisiana's border with Mississippi on Wednesday evening as campaigns work to get supporters to the polls and convince any undecided voters to back their candidate.

"Hurricane conditions and life-threatening storm surge are possible along portions of the northern Gulf Coast on Wednesday, and Storm Surge and Hurricane Watches are in effect," the National Hurricane Center warned.

"Between Tuesday night and Thursday, heavy rainfall is expected from portions of the central Gulf Coast into the southern Appalachians and Mid-Atlantic states near and in advance of Zeta. This rainfall will lead to flash, urban, small stream, and minor river flooding," the center explained.

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