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Mexican immigrant sues Chicago police for labeling him a gang member

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A Mexican immigrant sued Chicago police in federal court on Tuesday, saying he was mistakenly listed in a gang database that cost him federal protections and will lead to his deportation later this month.

Luis Vicente Pedrote-Salinas, 25, of Chicago, argued in a lawsuit filed in U.S. district court in Chicago that his false inclusion on the gang list led immigration agents to raid his home in 2011 and detain him. He was brought to the United States when he was five years old.

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U.S authorities denied his application for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, even though he met all the requirements, the lawsuit said. President Barack Obama created DACA to give people brought to the county as children temporary protection from deportation.

Pedrote must leave the country July 20.

The lawsuit seeks damages and asks the judge to declare that the city’s practices violated Pedrote’s constitutional rights.

Chicago police spokesman Frank Giancamilli declined to comment.

It is not the first lawsuit targeting the Chicago police database. Sejal Zota, legal director of the National Immigration Project, sued on behalf of a client in May she said was also mistakenly listed. Those concerns come as agents of Immigration and Customs Enforcement increasingly target gang members for deportation, she said.

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“The problem with these databases is you’re never informed that you’re part of a gang database, and you’re never confronted with any evidence they’re using,” she said.

“Mr. Pedrote was not the first, nor the last person to be targeted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement because of false information ICE received from the CPD,” the lawsuit said. “This gang database is arbitrary, over-inclusive and contains false information.”

Pedrote argued in the lawsuit that no process existed to allow him to contest inclusion.

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Pedrote’s troubles began in January 2011, when Chicago police working as part of a “gang suppression mission” arrested him on an alcohol-related charge that was later dismissed, the lawsuit said.

Police then falsely listed him as member of the Latin Kings, the lawsuit said, including him because of his race, age and neighborhood, and triggering a “catastrophic chain of events.”

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In August 2011, Pedrote was arrested by immigration agents acting on the gang information, the lawsuit said. After six months jail, he has fought to stay in the country.

(Reporting by Chris Kenning)


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Israel’s ‘most vulnerable’ hit by political stalemate

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Israel's grinding political deadlock has squeezed funding for programmes helping troubled youths, disadvantaged communities and the disabled, forcing state-backed social organisations to rely on crowd-funding to get by.

Polls indicate the country's March 2 election, the third in less than a year, will not produce a clear win for right-wing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu or his main rival Benny Gantz of the centrist Blue and White party.

That result could force more fraught coalition talks, prolonging the stalemate that has kept lawmakers from passing a budget for this year.

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‘America First’ vs ‘Make in India’ as Modi hosts Trump

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Trade ties between the United States and India have long been problematic but under "America First" President Donald Trump and "Make in India" Prime Minister Narendra Modi, they have worsened.

While eclipsed by his trade war with China, Trump's tussle with India, and New Delhi's prickly reaction, has made a major pact unlikely during the American president's visit to the world's fifth-largest economy from Monday.

"They've been hitting us very, very hard for many, many years," Trump said of India ahead of the 36-hour trip to Ahmedabad, Agra and New Delhi accompanied by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and others.

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Chinese restaurants starved for cash as virus hits industry

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It is lunch time in Beijing, but the only diner in Cindy's Cafe is an employee having a staff meal -- it has been closed for more than three weeks as China battles a deadly virus epidemic.

Restaurants are taking a huge hit as many people across the country of 1.4 billion have been either under some form of quarantine or are reluctant to venture outside since late January over fears of contagion.

At Cindy's Cafe in Beijing's Roosevelt Plaza, dine-in revenue has fallen to zero, and relying on deliveries hardly makes up the shortfall, said manager Cai Yaoyang.

"On a good day in the past, we could earn over 1,000 yuan ($143) a day from deliveries," Cai told AFP. "Now, it's just around 200 to 300 yuan a day. The impact is especially big."

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