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Mom feared beating by United employees — so she gave up toddler son’s $1,000 seat to standby passenger

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United Airlines has formally apologized to a Hawaii middle school teacher after it forced her to hold her 27-month-old son on her lap for over three hours because it had given away his seat to a standby passenger.

Hawaii News Now reports that Shirley Yamauchi last month had just boarded a flight from Houston to Boston to attend a teachers’ conference when a standby passenger arrived behind her and informed her that he had been given the seat that was supposed to go to her 2-year-old son.

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Yamamuchi tried in vain to get the flight attendant to help her resolve this problem, but the attendant told her the flight was full and simply walked away — thus forcing her to hold her young son in her lap for the duration of the flight.

“I had to move my son onto my lap,” she said. “He’s 25 pounds. He’s half my height. I was very uncomfortable. My hand, my left arm was smashed up against the wall. I lost feeling in my legs and left arm.”

Yamamuchi also said that she didn’t press the matter further because she feared United employees would beat her up, as they were infamously shown doing to passenger Dr. David Dao, whose violent removal from a flight from Chicago to Louisville back in April was captured on video.

“I started remembering all those incidents with United on the news,” she said. “The violence. Teeth getting knocked out. I’m Asian. I’m scared and I felt uncomfortable. I didn’t want those things to happen to me.”

United has now issued a formal apology to the woman, who paid $1,000 to secure her son’s ticket three months ago.

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“We deeply apologize to Ms. Yamauchi and her son for this experience,” the airline said. “We are refunding her son’s ticket and providing a travel voucher. We are also working with our gate staff to prevent this from happening again.”

Watch a video report on the incident below.

Hawaii News Now – KGMB and KHNL

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Pennsylvania Dem unloads on GOPers who pushed to reopen as they hid colleague’s COVID-19 infection

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Pennsylvania state Rep. Brian Sims (D) lashed out at Republican lawmakers who remained silent after testing positive for COVID-19.

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President Ronald Reagan, in the 1980s, famously asserted that someone who agreed with him 70% of the time was a 70% ally and not a 30% enemy. But President Donald Trump, on the other hand, is furious if someone disagrees with him even on rare occasions. Author Tony Schwartz, who co-wrote or ghost-wrote Trump’s famous 1987 book, “The Art of the Deal,” analyzes Trump’s mentality in a May 28 article for Medium — stressing that the president is motivated, above all else, by a “need to dominate.”

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Bill Barr and the White House plan to collect information on social media users when Trump signs Executive Order: reports

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A draft of President Donald Trump's social media executive order shows it would create disturbing structures that could allow the President of the United States to personally target social media companies he feels are taking action against his supporters, enable his supporters to report that action directly to the White House, and empower the Attorney General of the United States to collect publicly available "watch-lists" of social media users that monitor not only their online activities but their offline activities as well.

The draft is not final, but both the speed with which it will be signed and reports show it likely has not gone through interagency review, as CNN's Brian Fung, who calls it "hastily conceived," notes.

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