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Trump’s Fed nominee has history of benefiting from bailouts

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President Donald Trump’s pick to lead bank supervision at the Federal Reserve benefited from the government bailing out or rescuing two banks during the 2008 financial crisis, but that may not prevent his confirmation by a U.S. Senate controlled by a business-friendly Republican party, policy analysts told Reuters in recent days.

Randal Quarles, a former Wall Street lawyer and U.S. Treasury official who now runs an investment firm, was part of a team that invested in troubled or failed banks while he was an executive at private-equity firm Carlyle Group LP. Those investments earned hundreds of millions of dollars for Carlyle, profits that would not have been possible without government support.

A spokesman for Quarles did not respond to a request for comment. A spokesman for Carlyle declined to comment.

Democrats including Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown have said they intend to scrutinize Quarles’ ties to Wall Street during his confirmation hearing. Senator Elizabeth Warren described him as “straight off the Wall Street assembly line” in announcing her opposition in a statement.

But both the White House and Congress are controlled by Republicans, who have the ability to approve Trump’s nominees with a simple majority after Senate rules were changed in 2013. Under previous rules, the party in power would have needed at least 60 votes.

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Quarles is viewed by many policy analysts as a business-friendly pick who benefits from having experience in the federal government and his business ties are unlikely to be viewed by senior senators his Wall Street ties as a handicap.

“Profiting in the markets isn’t a scarlet letter in this Congress,” said Isaac Boltansky, director of policy research at Compass Point Trading & Research LLC, in Washington.

Before launching The Cynosure Group in 2014, Quarles was a partner and managing director at Carlyle.

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While there, he played a key role in making a $75 million investment in Boston Private Financial Holdings Inc, and was also part of a group that decided to jointly acquire failed lender BankUnited Inc from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp (FDIC), alongside private equity peers Blackstone Group LP, Centerbridge Partners LP and WL Ross & Co, as well as banker John Kanas.

Months after Carlyle’s equity infusion, Boston Private received a $150 million bailout from the Treasury Department, which it later repaid. Those taxpayer funds helped the firm weather the financial crisis, and allowed Carlyle to sell off its stake over time for a total of $150 million, effectively doubling its money, according to a Reuters review of share sales the firm disclosed in regulatory filings.

The FDIC had absorbed BankUnited’s losses at an estimated cost of $4.9 billion before selling healthier assets to the private equity consortium for $945 million. BankUnited later went public, with Carlyle selling shares worth around $428 million in portions through 2014, according to Reuters’ analysis of its disclosures.

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The tallies do not account for dividends or other undisclosed costs. Carlyle would not provide precise numbers for returns on those investments.

Involvement with taxpayer bailouts helped sink the earlier nomination of General Electric Co executive David Nason for the Federal Reserve supervisory position. Nason withdrew from vetting after Republicans criticized him for having structured the bailout program inside the Treasury Department during the Bush administration.

But Wilbur Ross, whose WL Ross & Co was part of the consortium that invested in BankUnited alongside Carlyle, successfully became U.S. Commerce Secretary.

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Quarles’ history on Wall Street may be a talking point during his confirmation hearings, but it is unlikely to bring down his nomination, lobbyists and financial regulatory lawyers said.

“At the end of the day, it’s really a ‘nothingburger,'” said Bob Kurucza, a partner in Goodwin Procter’s financial industry and investment management practice.

(Reporting by Olivia Oran in New York and Pete Schroeder in Washington; Editing by Lauren Tara LaCapra)


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected]. Send news tips to: [email protected].
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Democrat who lived under a dictatorship explains why she believes it is time to impeach Trump

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One of the Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee who will be interviewing special counsel Robert Mueller on Wednesday explained to MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell why she believes it is time to initiate impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell (D-FL) immigrated to the United States from Ecuador as a child. When Mucarsel-Powell was sworn-in to office following the 2018 midterm elections, she became the first Ecuadorian-American and first South American immigrant member of Congress.

"Most Americans don't have time to read a 448-page report," Mucarsel-Powell said. "We found substantial evidence that shows us that the president obstructed justice. "And I think it is critical for the American public to understand that and that’s why this hearing will be very important on Wednesday."

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Watch Rachel Maddow broadcast ‘exclusive story’ that undermines Mike Pence’s claims

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MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow on Monday presented an "exclusive story" -- that undermines public claims by the Trump administration.

Vice President Mike Pence has been among the biggest defenders of the detention camps the administration is running near the southern border.

Pence has described the treatment of detainees as "compassionate" and "excellent."

https://twitter.com/VP/status/1149879335454515200

But that was not what Maddow reported on Monday.

"You haven’t seen this anywhere else," she introduced. "This is the first time this has been broadcast."

The story was an exclusive interview NBC News correspondent Julia Ainsley conducted with a child refugee from Guatemala who was held in one of the camps for eleven days.

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WATCH: 10 videos show massive flooding hitting Brooklyn and New Jersey after torrential downpour

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A massive flood is once again striking parts of New York City and New Jersey Monday as the heatwave gave way to a torrential downpour.

The storm moved through after 6 p.m. EST, dropping several inches of rain in a short period and causing immense flash flooding during rush hour. Commuters reported unusually large crowds on subway platforms, water flowing down subway stairs and huge leaks in the ceilings.

Airports were also dealing with the storm blowing through with time delays at LaGuardia, JFK and the Newark Airports.

Some folks took the flood in stride, bringing out pool toys to ride the waves:

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