Watchdog group accuses HHS Sec. Tom Price of illegally using campaign cash to promote his Senate confirmation
Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price (Screen Capture)

A complaint was filed Friday against Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, claiming that he illegally used money from his congressional campaign fund to promote himself and his Senate confirmation.


A Wall Street Journal report detailed the complaint with the Federal Elections Commission by the Campaign Legal Center, which cited a $40,000 payment the congressman's campaign made Jan. 26 to America Rising, a Republican consulting firm. The complaint explained that the firm produced research and videos advocating for the confirmation of Price and other nominees to President Donald Trump's cabinet. Price, however, was the only one who used campaign funds to pay the firm.

The complaint also included some of the documents the America Rising gave to senators to urge a "yes" vote on Price.

Campaign finance laws bar elected officials from using their campaign money for their own personal gain. It's similar to the case where former Rep. Aaron Schock (R-IL) used campaign dollars to fund a lavish lifestyle on private planes and helicopters as well as a "Downton Abbey" inspired Congressional office, among other charges. Price's confirmation process was grueling as Democrats hammered him on his questionable stock trading and a $150,00 windfall when stocks sold. The Journal quoted federal ethics lawyer Ken Gross, who explained that as a congressman, Price would be able to use campaign money to defend himself. However, Price hasn't been a member of Congress since his confirmation on Feb. 10. Price's office at HHS didn't respond to any questions for comment." target="_blank">former Rep. Aaron Schock (R-IL) used campaign dollars to fund a lavish lifestyle on private planes and helicopters as well as a "Downton Abbey" inspired Congressional office, among other charges.

Price's confirmation process was grueling as Democrats hammered him on his questionable stock trading and a $150,00 windfall when stocks sold.

The Journal quoted federal ethics lawyer Ken Gross, who explained that as a congressman, Price would be able to use campaign money to defend himself. However, Price hasn't been a member of Congress since his confirmation on Feb. 10.

Price's office at HHS didn't respond to any questions for comment.