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Now climate change is coming for our sea turtles

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The US Fish and Wildlife Service proposed changing the status of green sea turtles, seen here, from endangered to threatened, on the basis that their populations have rebounded due to successful conservation efforts (AFP)

Frigid waters and scorching beaches could put them in peril, but people are fighting back. A cold-stunned Kemp’s ridley sea turtle waits its turn to be slowly warmed up in a kiddie pool. Julie O’Neil Every year, young sea turtles migrate up the East Coast to spend the summer foraging in northerly waters. Sometimes, they wind…

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2020 Election

US Rep. Dan Crenshaw calls expanding mail-in voting ‘playing with fire’ despite rarity of voter fraud

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U.S. Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Houston, doubled down on the claim that expanding voting by mail is not secure, saying it was like “playing with fire” in a conversation that aired Monday as part of the 2020 Texas Tribune Festival.

Republicans and President Donald Trump have repeatedly tried to sow doubt over the reliability of voting by mail, alleging it allows for widespread fraud.

During the interview with Politico’s Tim Alberta, Crenshaw raised concerns about voting practices in Pennsylvania and Nevada, falsely saying that Pennsylvania was sending unsolicited ballots to voters.

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Trump kicks out more health department staff as pandemic reaches 200,000 deaths

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Two more public health staffers are out as the coronavirus pandemic continues to rage and President Donald Trump clashes with doctors and experts about the virus.

Politico reported Monday that the move comes after HHS spokesman Michael Caputo took a leave of absence after posting a bizarre rant on Facebook and allegations that Trump has gone to war with the Food and Drug Administration.

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Emmys hit yet another all-time ratings low

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Television's Emmys plummeted to yet another all-time ratings low, despite producers overcoming technical challenges to pull off an innovative and well-received "remote" ceremony, ABC confirmed Monday.

The 72nd Emmys, broadcast from an empty Los Angeles theater with dozens of nominees and winners beaming in via video call due to the coronavirus pandemic, was watched by an average 6.1 million viewers.

Continuing a trend seen across nearly all major award shows, that figure declined from last year's 6.9 million -- itself down from a previous record low, 10.2 million, the year before.

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