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Marco Rubio urges Congress to adjust disaster aid bill for Puerto Rico

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Republican Senator Marco Rubio urged the U.S. Congress on Thursday to make changes to a disaster relief bill so that cash-strapped Puerto Rico can quickly access funds it needs to respond to the basic needs of its 3.4 million residents.

After meeting with Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello, Rubio said the territorial government is at risk of shutting down in the next 30 to 45 days because it has no money. He urged the Senate to adjust the terms of the aid in a bill passed by the House of Representatives last week.

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A month after Hurricane Maria laid waste to the island’s power grid, destroying homes, roads and other vital infrastructure, the bankrupt territory is struggling to provide basic services like running water, and pay its bills.

Private sector estimates of the damage to the U.S. territory run as high as $95 billion.

The Senate is expected to vote in the coming days on an aid package that includes $18.7 billion for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which has been helping Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands recover from three massive hurricanes.

But the terms of the aid require state and territorial governments to have completed the bulk of work on formal damage assessments – a process that is more difficult for Puerto Rico because of the catastrophic damage from the hurricane, Rubio said.

“Four weeks after the storm, they are where Florida was 48 hours after the storm,” said Rubio, a Republican from Florida who has been deeply involved in discussions over aid for the territory.

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“They’re still dealing with the acute, immediate challenges,” he told reporters.

Rossello, who was to meet with President Donald Trump at the White House at 12:15 p.m. ET on Thursday, has asked for approval to use disaster aid to cover repairs to schools, buildings and power plants.

The governor has also asked the White House and Congress for at least $4.6 billion in block grants and other types of funding.

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The White House budget office is working on internal estimates of funding needs and Congress is expected to consider another aid package by the end of December.

But that could come too late for cash-strapped Puerto Rico, Rubio said, noting the island currently has no tax revenue.

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“I know from experience the further away we get from these hurricanes, the less of a sense of urgency there is,” Rubio said.

(Additional reporting by Richard Cowan and Doina Chiacu; Editing by Dan Grebler)


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‘Why does he need to cheat?’ Intelligence Committee lawyer reveals why he’s concerned nothing will stop Trump

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During the impeachment hearing on Monday, Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell (D-FL) discussed President Donald Trump's solicitation of foreign election interference with Intelligence Committee lawyer Daniel Goldman — who offered a disturbing reason why he thinks Trump will just keep doing it.

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"At this point, he has shown not only a willingness to do it multiple times, but more importantly for all the members' consideration, he's also shown a lack of contrition, a lack of acknowledgement what he is doing is wrong and that it is wrong," said Goldman. "If you don't recognize that it is wrong, there is no reason why you won't do it again if you've already done it."

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Internet laughs out loud after Trump press secretary Stephanie Grisham says ‘let’s be honest’

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The credibility gap that has plagued official spokespeople for Donald Trump resulted in hilarious responses after she began her latest defense of the president with, "Let's be honest."

It started when Washington Post reporter David Nakamura noted an unfortunate young man who was stuck sitting next to Trump as the commander-in-chief issued a lie-filled rant about the "overthrow of government" in America.

This young man was invited to a White House roundtable on school choice but he had to sit there as Trump denounced the FBI's Russia investigation as an attempted "overthrow of government"--even though IG called probe legitimate and not political. pic.twitter.com/WdaYLudGnx

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US college baseball player who inspired ‘ice bucket challenge’ dies at 34

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A former US college baseball player who helped inspire the global phenomenon known as the "ice bucket challenge" to tackle a deadly neurodegenerative disease has died at the age of 34, his family said Monday.

A one-time college athlete from the Boston area, Pete Frates' struggle with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, was one of the inspirations behind the ice bucket challenge which took social media by storm in 2014.

Millions took up the challenge which involved dousing themselves with a bucket of ice cold water and posting the video online, before making a donation to medical research and daring others to do the same.

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