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Trump insists he received ‘love fest with standing ovations’ despite sharp Republican criticisms

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President Donald Trump hit back at critics within his own Republican party Wednesday, painting them as outliers in what is otherwise a “love fest” between him and allied lawmakers.

A day after Republican senators Jeff Flake and Bob Corker described Trump as having a “flagrant disregard” for truth and decency and of “debasing” the nation, the combative president shot back.

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Trying to forestall a wider party backlash, Trump said Flake and Corker had decided to resign from politics because they could not be reelected.

“The reason Flake and Corker dropped out of the Senate race is very simple, they had zero chance of being elected. Now act so hurt & wounded!” Trump tweeted.

“Jeff Flake, with an 18% approval rating in Arizona, said ‘a lot of my colleagues have spoken out.’ Really, they just gave me a standing O!” Trump said, hours after meeting Republican lawmakers on Capitol Hill.

“The meeting with Republican Senators yesterday, outside of Flake and Corker, was a love fest with standing ovations and great ideas for USA!” he continued.

Many Republicans privately express grave misgivings about Trump’s behavior in office, but remain publicly supportive.

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They see his presidency as the best way to enact long-standing party goals like tax reform and cutting the size of government.

The White House has worked hard to keep the party rank and file focused on those targets.

“Working hard on the biggest tax cut in U.S. history. Great support from so many sides. Big winners will be the middle class, business & JOBS,” Trump also tweeted Wednesday.

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But Trump’s ascendency has also led to a battle for the soul of the Republican party, with establishment conservatives struggling to stop an insurgency from the more populist and nationalist wing of the party.


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Matt Gaetz compared top Florida leaders in history — who were actually respectable

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Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) made news Thursday when he went after former Vice President Joe Biden's son for past drug problems. While many families are fighting the drug war, Gaetz family faced a problem when he was pulled over by police just two years before running for office in Florida.

"I don’t want to make light of anybody’s substance abuse issues,” Gaetz said Thursday before making light of the younger Biden's substance abuse issues.

Rep. Hank Johnson (D-GA) said it was the perfect example of the "pot calling the kettle black."

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Trump’s mental derangement suggests he experienced abuse in childhood: psychiatrist

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President Donald Trump's outlandish behavior is the result of childhood trauma that he has not worked through, "Couples Therapy" star Dr. Jenn Mann told TMZ.

"One, he's someone who gets triggered easily," she explained. "Two, he has terrible impulse control, very poor impulse control. Developmentally, his ability to control his impulses ... he's almost like a young child."

"Take me back to the childhood, what do you think caused this?" the reporter asked. "What caused -- this?"

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Judge orders State Department to expand search for records of Rudy Giuliani and Mike Pompeo communications

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This Friday, a federal judge ordered the State Department to ramp up its search for records detailing communications in regards to Ukraine between Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and President Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, McClatchy reports.

Judge Christopher Cooper of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia wants the State Department to expand on its release last month of records documenting contact between the two.

Cooper gave the the State Department until January 8 to release all records documenting "emails, text messages, call logs and scheduled meetings on Ukraine policy that were dated until October 18," adding that the department had “not adequately justified why its Executive Secretariat used a cut-off date," according to McClatchy.

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