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Congress wants to subpoena Trump campaign digital director after he refused to deny foreign contacts: report

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Congressional investigators say two companies that ran digital operations for Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign haven’t adequately denied foreign contacts — and are subpoenaing them for that information after they refused or ignored their initial requests.

As Business Insider reports, ranking members of the House Oversight and Judiciary committees announced their intention to subpoena Cambridge Analytica and Giles-Parscale for any “information from a foreign government or foreign actor” they had during the campaign.

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“Giles-Parscale and Cambridge Analytica did not deny that they had contacts or communications with foreign governments or foreign actors during the 2016 campaign,” Reps. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) and Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) wrote to House Oversight Committee chair Trey Gowdy on Thursday.

While other companies that worked with Republicans provided information that “asserted unequivocally that none of their employees had contacts with any foreign agents during the presidential campaign,” Cambridge Analytica and Giles-Parscale failed to do so.

Brad Parscale, co-founder of Giles-Parscale and the Trump campaign’s digital director, refused an initial request from the committees sent in October. In his letter, Parscale said that although he agreed that he “would not want foreign governments meddling in our elections,” he had no “firsthand knowledge of foreign interference in the 2016 election.”

Moreover, he said he was “cooperating fully” with special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation and other congressional inquiries on Russian meddling, and would not provide them documentation this is “duplicative of their work.”

As BI notes, Parscale’s digital operations were supervised by Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and adviser. Cambridge Analytica is well-known as an arm of the Republican megadonor Mercer family, who have funded Steve Bannon and Breitbart for years. Rebekah Mercer reportedly tried to buy Hillary Clinton’s missing emails from WikiLeaks before deciding it would leave her open to litigation.

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2020 Election

Trump advisors futilely trying to get him to stop ranting about statues as his re-election prospects collapse: report

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According to a report focusing on Donald Trump's rally at Mt. Rushmore on the evening before the 4th of July, advisors to the president ate attempting to get him to start focusing on bread and butter issues that will get him re-elected instead of harping on statues being pulled down by protesters across the country.

As the Daily Beast report illustrates, their efforts appear to be futile based upon his Friday night speech.

With the president trying to fire up the crowd by insisting, “Angry mobs are trying to tear down statues of our founders. They think the American people are weak, and soft, and submissive,” the Beast reported that Trump, "decided to focus heavily Friday evening on protesters and Black Lives Matter activists who want various American monuments, including those honoring Confederate, white-supremacist, and slave-owning figures of history, torn down and destroyed for good. "

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Trump’s a traitor — and the Russian bounty scandal is the final straw

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The first story of the rest of Donald Trump's life was published last Friday in the New York Times, revealing that the Russian intelligence agency known as the GRU has been paying bonuses to Taliban fighters to kill Americans, and that this intelligence had been reported to Trump and had been known at least since March. The story was subsequently confirmed by the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal and the AP.

This article first appeared in Salon.

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2020 Election

GOP scrambling to pay for Jacksonville convention after Trump yanked it from North Carolina: report

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According to a report from the New York Times, Republican officials are having difficulties getting donors to pay for the Republican National Convention to be held in Jacksonville, Florida after Donald Trump yanked the gathering out of Charlotte, North Carolina in a fit of pique over COVID-19 health restrictions.

At issue, the report notes, is that millions of dollars were spent in North Carolina where a smaller event will now be held, and now the party is, in essence, forced to pay for a second convention.

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