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Senators will try to pull US from Yemen war

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U.S. lawmakers unveiled plans on Wednesday to use a decades-old law to force a Senate vote on whether to pull the country out of a foreign conflict, in this case the civil war in Yemen.

Republican Senator Mike Lee, independent Bernie Sanders and Democrat Chris Murphy said they would make the first attempt to take advantage of a provision in the 1973 War Powers Act that allows any senator to introduce a resolution on whether to withdraw U.S. armed forces from a conflict not authorized by Congress.

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Their action was the latest salvo in an ongoing battle between the U.S. Congress and the White House over control of military conflicts.

“We believe that, as Congress has not declared war or authorized military force, this conflict (in Yemen) is unconstitutional and unauthorized,” Sanders told a news conference.

Lawmakers have argued for years that Congress has ceded too much authority over the military to the White House.

Under the Constitution, Congress — not the president — has the authority to declare war. But divisions over how much control they should exert over the Pentagon have stymied efforts to pass new war authorizations.

Democratic and Republican presidents have said a 2001 authorization for the fight against al Qaeda and its affiliates justifies the Afghanistan war and the fight against Islamic State in Syria.

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But Senate aides said that authorization did not apply in Yemen.

It was not immediately clear how the resolution would move forward without support from the Republican leadership. Spokesmen for Majority Leader Mitch McConnell did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

A Saudi-led coalition supported by the United States has been fighting the Iran-aligned Houthi movement in Yemen since 2015 to try to restore president Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi to power.

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The war’s heavy toll on civilians has long been a sore point with the U.S. Congress, triggering threats to block assistance to the Saudi-led coalition.

U.S. forces are backing the coalition by refueling its aircraft and providing some intelligence support. U.S. officials have declined to say precisely how many U.S. forces are on the ground in Yemen, citing security concerns.

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The war has killed more than 10,000 people, displaced more than 2 million and driven Yemen — already the poorest country on the Arabian Peninsula — to the verge of widespread famine.

(Reporting by Patricia Zengerle; Editing by Sandra Maler)


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Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan to give up royal titles — ‘the hardest #Megxit possible’

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Britain's Prince Harry and his wife Meghan will give up their royal titles and public funding as part of a settlement with the Queen to start a new life away from the British monarchy.

The historic announcement from Buckingham Palace on Saturday follows more than a week of intense private talks aimed at managing the fallout of the globetrotting couple's shock resignation from front-line royal duties.

It means Queen Elizabeth II's grandson Harry and his American TV actress wife Meghan will stop using the titles "royal highness" -- the same fate that befell his late mother Princess Diana after her divorce from Prince Charles in 1996.

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GOP senator tells home-state press that impeachment trial must be ‘viewed as fair’: report

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Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) spoke to local reporters on Saturday about her role in the upcoming Donald Trump impeachment trial.

Murkowski explained she would likely vote with Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on an initial vote on whether to allow witnesses. However, she left the door open to voting for witnesses after House impeachment managers make their opening case.

"I don't know what more we need until I have been given the base case," she said. "We will have that opportunity to say 'yes' or 'no' ... and if we say 'yes,' the floor is open."

Overall, Murkowski said it was important for the trial to been viewed as fair.

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White House press secretary urged to do her job: ‘We don’t pay you to be a Twitter troll’

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White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham was blasted on Saturday over the confusion resulting from her refusal to hold daily press briefings.

CNN senior media reporter Oliver Darcy was alarmed that Grisham's assistant, Hogan Gidley, was forcing reporters to refer to his remarks as coming from a "sources close to the President's legal team."

Darcy noted that Trump had repeatedly questioned the veracity of unnamed sources, making it problematic for Gidley to demand to be quoted as such.

https://twitter.com/oliverdarcy/status/1218704788432572422

Grisham responded to the criticism and asked Darcy to "stop with the righteous indignation.

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