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Nashville mayor resigns after pleading guilty to theft

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Nashville Mayor Megan Barry resigned on Tuesday after pleading guilty in state court to theft in connection with an extramarital affair she admitted to having with the head of her security detail.

In late January, Barry admitted she had a two-year affair with Metropolitan Nashville Police Department Sergeant Robert Forrest, who resigned a day before the mayor’s admission.

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Under a deal reached with the Davidson County District Attorney General’s Office in Nashville, Barry pleaded guilty in Davidson County Criminal Court to three counts of felony theft and was ordered to repay the city $11,000 for money that prosecutors said was spent on overtime for Forrest.

“I will watch as a private citizen and I will be tremendously proud,” she told reporters after the hearing, referring to the city. “I love you Nashville.”

Barry, a Democrat, had faced calls to resign and was the subject of multiple investigations, including a criminal inquiry by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigations.

She said Vice Mayor David Briley would be sworn in as mayor on Tuesday.

Forrest also pleaded guilty on Tuesday to the same charges and agreed to repay the city $45,000 for salary and overtime earned on the job when he was not performing his duties as the mayor’s security detail, prosecutors said. Both Barry and Forrest received three years probation.

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As part of the plea deals both had negotiated, Davidson County District Attorney General Glenn Funk said in a statement that Barry and Forrest could petition the court to expunge their criminal records if they successfully complete probation.

Editing by Ben Klayman and Bernadette Baum


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Nagasaki marks 75 years since atomic bombing

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The Japanese city of Nagasaki on Sunday commemorated the 75th anniversary of its destruction by a US atomic bomb, with its mayor and the head of the United Nations warning against a nuclear arms race.

Nagasaki was flattened in an atomic inferno three days after Hiroshima -- twin nuclear attacks that rang in the nuclear age and gave Japan the bleak distinction of being the only country to be struck by atomic weapons.

Survivors, their relatives and a handful of foreign dignitaries attended a remembrance ceremony in Nagasaki where they called for world peace.

Participants offered a silent prayer at 11:02 am (0202 GMT), the time the second and last nuclear weapon used in wartime was dropped over the city.

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Lebanon information minister resigns over Beirut blast

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Lebanon’s information minister Manal Abdel Samad on Sunday quit in the first government resignation since a deadly port blast killed more than 150 people and destroyed swathes of Beirut.

?After the enormous Beirut catastrophe, I announce my resignation from government,? she said in a statement carried by local media, apologising to the Lebanese public for failing them.

A number of MPs also submitted their resignations a day earlier due to the explosions.

On Saturday afternoon, thousands took to streets in downtown Beirut in anti-government protests that demand the overhaul of the political system, days after massive explosions.

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2020 Election

Trump admitted on live TV he will ‘terminate’ Social Security and Medicare if reelected in November

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President Donald Trump on Saturday afternoon openly vowed to permanently "terminate" the funding mechanism for both Social Security and Medicare if reelected in November—an admission that was seized upon by defenders of the popular safety net programs who have been warning for months that the administration's threat to suspend the payroll tax in the name of economic relief during the Covid-19 pandemic was really a backdoor sabotage effort.

Announcing and then signing a series of legally dubious executive orders, including an effort to slash the emergency federal unemployment boost by $200 from the $600 previously implemented by Democrats, Trump touted his order for a payroll tax "holiday"—which experts noted would later have to be paid back—but said if he won in November that such a cut would become permanent.

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