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Suspected gang members kill priest in El Salvador

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Suspected gang members in El Salvador gunned down a young priest Thursday on his way to celebrate Holy Week festivities, police said.

Father Walter Osmir Vasquez, 31, was driving on a dirt road outside the town of Lolotique, 130 kilometres (80 miles) east of San Salvador when gunmen cut him off and shot him dead, police in that town said.

No motive was given. The government condemned the killing and ordered an investigation.

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Soldiers joined police searching for the killers in the area of the attack.

El Salvador has one of the world’s highest homicide rates — 60,000 per 100,000 inhabitants last year. The government blames powerful street gangs for much of the violence that has engulfed the poor Central American country.


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Here’s the real reason why Trump rolled over on holding the G7 summit at his golf resort

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President Donald Trump blamed his reversal on hosting the G7 summit at his Doral golf resort on Democratic critics, but the real reason is exactly the opposite.

An administration official revealed that Trump decided not to host the international event at his struggling Florida club after Republicans objected to the idea, reported the Washington Post.

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Kushner increasingly frustrated with Mulvaney after ‘self-immolation’ on Fox News: report

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Following what turned out to be another disastrous performance by acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney on Fox News on Sunday, Politico is reporting that his tenure serving Donald Trump may be coming to an end now that Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner is turning against him.

On Sunday Mulvaney curiously decided to appear on "Fox News Sunday"with combative host Chris Wallace to defend his quid pro quo comments he made in a press conference where he all but admitted that the White House was asking for dirt on political opponents in return for foreign aid. Mulvaney's off-hand remark that Trump views his first job as being in the "hospitality business" to defend his G7 Doral decision then made the situation worse.

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The impeachment of Donald Trump: Here’s how it will work — assuming anything still works

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Now that the House of Representatives has launched an impeachment inquiry into President Trump, it’s time to understand how this process will actually work. It has only played out in full twice before in American history, 130 years apart. What does it take to impeach a president and remove him or her from office? How many times has a president faced this type of crisis? What are the undisputed facts (if any) regarding Trump’s situation?

Impeachment is not the same thing as removing a president from office.

The term “impeachment” is commonly used interchangeably with “removal” as regards a president, but this is not accurate. When a president is impeached, that refers to the constitutional process wherein a majority of members of the House decides that the president has committed “high crimes and misdemeanors” serious enough to warrant removal from office. If the House impeaches the president, the Senate then holds a trial — with the chief justice of the Supreme Court as presiding judge — to determine whether he or she should be convicted. While only a simple majority is necessary for impeachment, a two-thirds majority is necessary to convict a president in the Senate.

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