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Former US President George HW Bush out of intensive care

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Former U.S. President George H.W. Bush has been moved from an intensive care unit at Houston Methodist Hospital to a regular patient room as he recovers from an infection that spread to his blood, a spokesman said on Wednesday.

The 93-year-old former president “is alert and talking with hospital staff, family and friends, and his doctors are very pleased with his progress,” spokesman Jim McGrath said in a statement.

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Bush, a Republican who served a single term from 1989 to 1993, is expected to continue his recovery in the hospital for several more days, McGrath said.

 Bush was admitted to the Houston hospital on Sunday, a day after he attended the funeral of his wife, Barbara, a former first lady who died on April 17. The couple had been married for 73 years.
 
“President Bush naturally thanks everyone for their prayers and good wishes,” the statement said.
“He also wants to assure everyone that, as good as he feels now, he is more focused on the Houston Rockets closing out their playoff series against the Minnesota Timberwolves than anything that landed him in the hospital,” the statement said, referring to Houston’s National Basketball Association team.

McGrath has said that Bush, the oldest living U.S. president, is being treated for an infection that spread to his blood.

 Bush was admitted to the same hospital about a year ago for a cough that was later diagnosed as a mild case of pneumonia, McGrath said at the time.
Bush is the father of former Republican President George W. Bush, who served two terms from 2001 through 2009, and former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, who unsuccessfully sought the 2016 Republican presidential nomination.

Reporting by Ian Simpson in Washington; Editing by Steve Orlofsky and Peter Cooney

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‘Will surely trigger’ the ‘snowflake crowd’: Internet celebrates climate activist Greta Thunberg as TIME’s Person of the Year

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TIME magazine has just named Swedish climate crisis and environmental activist Greta Thunberg its 2019 "Person of the Year" and the immediate responses are overwhelmingly positive -- for several reasons. Many are offering congratulations, saying it is well-deserved. But given the disgraceful and disgusting attacks the 16 year-old has endured from climate and science denying conservatives, some are enjoying the double-edged award because it "will trigger all the right people."

Here's TIME's announcement.

.@GretaThunberg is TIME's 2019 Person of the Year #TIMEPOY https://t.co/YZ7U6Up76v pic.twitter.com/SWALBfeGl6

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I thought Democrats were making a giant mistake on impeachment — but these experts changed my mind

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On Tuesday, Democratic leaders in the House of Representatives announced that they would move forward with two articles of impeachment — involving abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — against President Donald Trump.

At first, I shared the frustration of many liberals and progressives that these articles are too limited in scope, and leave a great many of Trump’s apparent misdeeds unmentioned. But further reflection and exchanges with legal experts have convinced me that appearance is misleading. In fact, Democrats have performed a deft feat. In a single stroke — OK, two strokes — they have elevated the process of holding Trump accountable above the realm of partisan politics, and have also given the Democratic nominee (whoever that is) an excellent case to use against Trump in next year’s presidential election. The challenge for Democrats going forward will be to keep that nonpartisan outlook in mind — while understanding that, ultimately and unfortunately, the only possible way to hold Trump accountable will be through partisan politics.

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‘Robotic blacksmithing’: A technology that could revive US manufacturing

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Although it may not be obvious, there’s a close link between manufacturing technology and innovation. Elon Musk often talks of the “machines that build the machines” as being the real enabler in both his space and automotive businesses.

Using less-expensive, more scalable processes allows Space X to launch missions on budgets and with speed that would be unthinkable using NASA’s old-school manufacturing methods. And the new Tesla Cybertruck’s unorthodox design appears to take advantage of a simplified manufacturing process that does away with “die stamping” metal in favor of bending and folding metal sheets.

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