Quantcast
Connect with us

Groups sue to stop Iowa’s ‘fetal heartbeat’ abortion ban

Published

on

Planned Parenthood and the Iowa branch of the American Civil Liberties Union said they sued on Tuesday to stop a state law from coming into effect that would impose the strictest abortion limits in the United States.

Iowa’s Republican-controlled legislature voted last month to outlaw an abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected, effectively banning the procedure at about the six-week mark, which may be before a woman realizes she is pregnant.

ADVERTISEMENT

The lawsuit was anticipated by some sponsors of the law, who hoped to trigger a challenge to Roe v. Wade, the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973 decision that established that women have a constitutional right to an abortion.

The lawsuit in Polk County District Court seeks a hearing within two weeks to block the law before it goes into effect on July 1.

 “Iowa will not go back in time by taking away this right,” Suzanna de Baca, the president of Planned Parenthood of the Heartland, told reporters at a news conference announcing the lawsuit. “Planned Parenthood is challenging this law because the Iowa Constitution is clear a woman has a right to access a safe and legal abortion.”
There are some exceptions to the law, such as in some cases of rape and incest and in a serious medical emergency, but Planned Parenthood, which performs abortions, and ACLU say the exceptions are too narrow.

 
Abortion opponents hope such a lawsuit could bring the divisive abortion issue back before the U.S. Supreme Court in the belief that the 5-4 conservative majority could curtail abortion access or ban it outright.

Rick Bertrand, a Republican state senator from Sioux City, said last month the law was in part “an opportunity to take a run at Roe v. Wade.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Planned Parenthood and ACLU said they hope to avoid that possibility by only challenging the law under the Iowa Constitution, which they also say guarantees a woman’s right to abortion, not the U.S. Constitution.

Supporters of the Iowa law could not be reached for immediate comment.

 
The Emma Goldman Clinic in Iowa City, which describes itself as the first abortion provider in the state after the passage of Roe v. Wade, is a co-plaintiff in the lawsuit.

ADVERTISEMENT

A law passed in Iowa last year that requires a minimum 72-hour waiting period before getting an abortion is currently blocked while the Iowa Supreme Court decides whether to strike it down.

Reporting by Jonathan Allen in New York; Editing by Scott Malone and Tom Brown

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

‘I think he went crazy’: Trial lawyer reveals ‘no one can explain’ Rudy Giuliani

Published

on

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani is already under criminal investigation by federal prosecutors. Yet, Giuliani maintains that he will prevail as the ultimate hero of the story.

In a Sunday panel discussion, two top legal minds, NYU Professor Melissa Murray and notorious trial lawyer Steve Sussman discussed the strange pivot made by the mayor.

"I think he went crazy," Sussman said of Giuliani's evolution over the years. "I know people used to respect him. He was America's Mayor. And I think -- my theory is that when men get to be over 75 or 75, they do crazy -- they're in fear of becoming irrelevant. His was he's not going to be on any more afternoon talk shows. He was not going to be important anymore. So, you're looking for a way: how can you become relevant? And he became, I say, -- Trump talks about a deep state. There is a shadow state. He was a shadow Secretary of State, Rudy. We have a shadow attorney general. We have a lot of -- maybe Rudy was a shadow attorney general."

Continue Reading

Facebook

MSNBC analyst shreds GOP claim impeachment is an effort to change the 2016 election

Published

on

Republicans have claimed that the reason Democrats have sought impeachment, either from the Russia scandal to the Ukraine scandal, is that they want to unmake the 2016 election. Speaking to MSNBC Sunday, NYU Law Prof. Melissa Murray ripped the claim to shreds.

First, impeachment would only remove President Donald Trump is the Republican Senate voted to do so. If the president were removed, the new president wouldn't be Hillary Clinton; it would be Mike Pence, getting Democrats no victories other than upholding the rule of law.

"As these proceedings go away, there is building support for impeachment; it will require a supermajority of the Senate in order to convict and remove the president, which will require some Republican Senators to peel off and depart from the path," Murray said. "But I think the really important thing that Bob has mentioned here is this idea ta the Republicans are taunting that impeachment is a backend effort to basically subvert the will of the people. I think the testimony that was presented yesterday makes clear that that claim is specious."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Rudy Giuliani’s devotion has escorted Trump straight to impeachment

Published

on

"Step by step, [Rudy Giuliani] has escorted President Trump to the brink of impeachment," The New York Times said in a piece following the president's top lawyer and his impact on the scandals facing the 45th president.

Two associates of Giuliani's have already been indicted, Giuliani is under criminal investigation from federal prosecutors, and he was never graced with a top position in the Trump government.

"The separate troubles he has gotten his client and himself into are products of the uniquely powerful position he has fashioned, a hybrid of unpaid personal counsel to the president and for-profit peddler of access and advice," The Times said Sunday.

Continue Reading