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Trump campaign aide Paul Manafort sued by bankruptcy trustee over California property deal

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A bankruptcy trustee has filed a lawsuit against Paul Manafort in California alleging that he falsely claimed he was a creditor owed $2.7 million in a failed real estate deal with his former son-in-law.

The lawsuit, filed by trustee Thomas Casey on Thursday in the federal bankruptcy court in Santa Ana, California, adds to the legal challenges facing Manafort, who was head of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign for a few months in 2016.

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A spokesman for Manafort declined to comment on the lawsuit.

 Manafort has been indicted for money laundering, tax evasion and other charges by a special counsel probing alleged links between the Trump campaign and Russia. Manafort has denied the charges and is preparing for trial.
The California lawsuit relates to a $2.7 million deed of trust that Manafort recorded in Los Angeles County that positioned himself as a secured creditor in a luxury property he was developing in partnership with his former son-in-law, Jeffrey Yohai.

The deed of trust was recorded Dec. 20, 2016, one day before the company that owned the property filed for bankruptcy protection to stave off foreclosure by lender Genesis Capital LLC, according to property and court records.

Casey, whose job as trustee is to liquidate the assets of the bankruptcy estate for the benefit of creditors, alleges in the lawsuit that the money Manafort put into the property was equity and not a loan as Manafort claimed.

Casey said the attempt by Manafort to claim the more advantageous position of creditor amounted to a “fraudulent transfer” of assets “made with the actual intent to hinder, delay or defraud”.

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Manafort signed the deed of trust as “attorney-in-fact” for Yohai, who had granted Manafort the power to act as his attorney on Dec. 1, 2016, according to the lawsuit.

Casey, who is seeking to void the deed of trust and “a money judgment against the Defendant in the amount of the Transfer”, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

 Jim Hinds, a lawyer for Yohai, did not respond to an email seeking comment.
Reporting by Nathan Layne in NEW YORKEditing by Christopher Cushing

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A startling trove of documents reveals the truth about Afghanistan

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The disclosures are extreme, but, sadly, what we have come to expect of government–across administrations.

The Washington Post obtained 2,000 documents showing that over years, news of U.S. military deployment to Afghanistan was routinely and repeatedly manipulated to reflect a rosier picture than what was happening on the ground. Further, the documents show that there was confusion about military mission and what would amount to success across the 18 years of deployment under the Bush, Obama and Trump administrations.

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Rift emerges between McConnell and Trump as president seeks to turn impeachment ‘into a spectacle’: report

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As the Senate impeachment trial against President Trump looms, there's a growing rift between Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as to how the trial should move forward, CNN reports.

McConnell is reportedly hoping for a speedy trial in order to avoid further "partisan warfare." But according to CNN, Trump wants the "dramatic event" that the trial would likely produce, "hoping to turn it into a spectacle, which he thinks is his best chance to hurt Democrats in the election."

"Any difference of strategic opinion is as much a reflection of the fluid nature on what a Senate trial will entail, multiple people involved said," CNN's Kaitlan Collins and Phil Mattingly report. "McConnell himself has repeatedly said publicly that at this point, there simply isn't an answer as to the length, structure or potential witnesses until the House moves further along with its articles of impeachment. For the moment, these people say, ideas or specific positions on how a trial should go are just that: ideas and opinions. The final form will likely be dictated by where McConnell's 53-member conference stands on the issue in the weeks ahead."

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CNN panel crushes Bill Barr’s Ukraine lies with live fact check: ‘He doesn’t have a right to his own opinion’

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Attorney General Bill Barr was called out by a CNN panel on Tuesday after he incorrectly said that the FBI ignored evidence that would have exculpated President Donald Trump's campaign regarding allegations of Russian collusion.

As Barr spoke live to The Wall Street Journal on Tuesday afternoon, a panel of CNN analysts commented on the attorney general's utterances.

"In general, he said, from day one there was evidence that was exculpatory evidence that there was no collusion and the FBI ignored that," CNN's Dana Bash announced. "Let's just start with that. True or false?"

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