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Supreme Court voids Minnesota ban on voter political apparel

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States cannot completely bar people from wearing T-shirts, buttons or other apparel bearing political messages in polling sites, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Thursday in an important free speech decision striking down a Minnesota law as unconstitutional.

The court, in the 7-2 ruling, said Minnesota’s law, which dates back to 1912, went too far in banning political apparel but left room for states to limit what should be allowed in polling places and what should not. The justices sent the case back down to the lower court.

Minnesota has tried to promote voting “in a setting removed from the clamor and din of electioneering,” conservative Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in the opinion. “While that choice is generally worthy of our respect, Minnesota has not supported its good intentions with a law capable of reasoned application.”
Roberts was joined by the other four conservatives on the court as well as liberal justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan. Liberal Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Stephen Breyer dissented from the decision.

Delaware, Kansas, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and South Carolina impose restrictions similar to Minnesota’s.

The Supreme Court endorsed the argument advanced by the conservative activists who challenged Minnesota’s law, finding that it ran afoul of the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment guarantee of freedom of speech.

The justices issued the ruling against a backdrop of deepening political polarization in America. In another major ruling involving free speech at polling sites, the high court in 1992 upheld a Tennessee law that barring the solicitation of votes and the display or distribution of campaign materials within 100 feet (30 meters) of a polling place.

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Reporting by Andrew Chung; Editing by Will Dunham

Roberts was joined by the other four conservatives on the court as well as liberal justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan. Liberal Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Stephen Breyer dissented from the decision.

Delaware, Kansas, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and South Carolina impose restrictions similar to Minnesota’s.

The Supreme Court endorsed the argument advanced by the conservative activists who challenged Minnesota’s law, finding that it ran afoul of the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment guarantee of freedom of speech.

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The justices issued the ruling against a backdrop of deepening political polarization in America. In another major ruling involving free speech at polling sites, the high court in 1992 upheld a Tennessee law that barring the solicitation of votes and the display or distribution of campaign materials within 100 feet (30 meters) of a polling place.

Reporting by Andrew Chung; Editing by Will Dunham

Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
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Iran and US trade barbs after drone incident and ahead of new sanctions

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The United States on Monday was due to tighten sanctions on Iran as the two countries traded barbs in a tense standoff sparked by Washington's withdrawal from a nuclear deal.

Both nations say they want to avoid going to war, but tensions have spiralled as a series of incidents, including attacks on tankers and the shooting down of a US drone by Iran in the Gulf, raised fears of an unintended slide towards conflict.

On Sunday, Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said a US-made MQ9 Reaper "spy drone" -- also widely used for carrying out military strikes -- had encroached his country's airspace on May 26.

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John Oliver warns Trump didn’t have an ‘Ebenezer Scrooge moment’ deciding to be ‘good’ — he’s still Trump

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John Oliver Trump hair

The best thing you can say about Donald Trump is that he "maybe hasn't eaten a dolphin before," John Oliver joked on his Sunday episode of "Last Week Tonight."

Oliver warned people that while Trump had a "change of heart" about Iran it was only about Iran. "He didn't have an Ebenezer Scrooge moment, threw open a window and yelled, 'I'm going to be good from now on!'" the host explained. "No, he just didn't bomb some people."

As Fox News explained, the drown that Iran shot down was not simply one from Amazon. Oliver said it wasn't like Trump said, "Alexa, send a drone to surveil Iran." According to Fox's genius analysis, those drones cost actual money.

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Donald Trump’s biggest regret is choosing Jeff Sessions as his attorney general

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In an interview that aired on Sunday, President Donald Trump told "Meet the Press" that his biggest regret is choosing Jeff Sessions to be his attorney general.

"If you could have one do-over as president, what would it be?" NBC host Chuck Todd asked Trump during their interview.

This article first appeared at Salon.com.After the president replied that his do over would involve "personnel," he elaborated that "I would say if I had one do over, it would be, I would not have appointed Jeff Sessions to be attorney general." When Todd asked Trump to clarify if he thought appointing Sessions was his "worst mistake," the president reiterated "yeah, that was the biggest mistake." He added that Sessions is "very talented" but was cut off by a new line of questioning from Todd before he could elaborate.

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