Quantcast
Connect with us

Extreme conditions expected as firefighters battle California blazes

Published

on

Extreme weather conditions are expected to return on Thursday and could stoke wildfires in California where thousands of weary firefighters are battling the destructive and deadly blazes.

In the Redding area, where the Carr Fire has killed six people, including two firefighters, fierce winds of 25 miles (40 km) per hour, temperatures above 95 degrees Fahrenheit (35 Celsius) and extremely low humidity were in the forecast from Thursday evening until Saturday, the National Weather Service said.

ADVERTISEMENT

This could lead to “dangerous and rapid irregular spreading of a large wildfire”, the service said in an advisory.

The Carr Fire has destroyed more than 1,546 structures in and around Redding, a city of 90,000 people about 160 miles (260 km) north of the state capital, Sacramento.

Authorities on Wednesday reopened more evacuated neighborhoods as ground crews, aided by diminished winds, extended buffer lines carved out of thick, dry brush along the fire’s edge to 35 percent of its perimeter, officials said.

California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire) commanders said on Wednesday the fire, sparked by a vehicle on July 23, was burning with far less intensity this week and posed little immediate threat to populated areas.

Despite the outlook, strong gusts along the upper ridge lines were a concern on the fire’s rugged western flanks, a few miles from the town of Lewiston, which remained evacuated.

ADVERTISEMENT

More than 4,200 firefighters have spent 11 days battling the blaze, which has scorched 121,000 acres (49,000 hectares), laying waste to entire neighborhoods in the scenic Shasta-Trinity region.

Law enforcement officials said the last four people reported as missing among a list of 20 whose names were published on Tuesday were located safe on Wednesday.

The Carr Fire was one of eight large wildfires burning in the state and 93 burning in the United States, mostly in the West, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.

ADVERTISEMENT

The intense wildfires have been fueled by several years of drought-dessicated vegetation, and stoked by frequent and persistent bouts of erratic winds and triple-digit temperatures.

To the southwest of the Carr Fire, more than 3,000 firefighters were battling the 95,000-acre Medocino Complex, made up of the Ranch and River fires that have destroyed seven homes and forced thousands to evacuate. High temperatures, low humidity and afternoon winds along with low fuel moistures are aiding large fire growth, fire officials said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Reporting by Brendan O’Brien in Milwaukee; editing by David Stamp


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Donald Trump is no longer president: Robert Reich

Published

on

You’d be forgiven if you hadn’t noticed. His verbal bombshells are louder than ever, but Donald J. Trump is no longer president of the United States.

By having no constructive response to any of the monumental crises now convulsing America, Trump has abdicated his office.

He is not governing. He’s golfing, watching cable TV, and tweeting.

How has Trump responded to the widespread unrest following the murder in Minneapolis of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white police officer knelt on his neck for nine minutes as he was handcuffed on the ground?

He has incited more police violence. Trump called the protesters “thugs” and threatened to have them shot. “When the looting starts, the shooting starts,” he tweeted, parroting a former Miami police chief whose words spurred race riots in the late 1960s.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump-loving Minneapolis police union boss calls the cops on a reporter for knocking on his door

Published

on

Lt. Bob Kroll, the Trump-loving president of the Police Officers Federation of Minneapolis, called the police this week on a Washington Post reporter for the purported offense of knocking on the door of his house.

In an effort to get Kroll to respond to the charges that were filed this week against all four Minneapolis police officers involved in George Floyd's death, the Post sent one of its reporter to Krolls house after multiple other requests for comment went unanswered.

"A Washington Post reporter who knocked on Kroll’s door was soon pulled over by a police officer who said that Kroll had reported suspicious activity on his front porch and that 'he doesn’t want any press,'" the paper reports.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

‘I know a dying administration when I see one’: British journalist says brutal crackdown will seal Trump’s doom

Published

on

British journalist Ed Luce called out Senate Republicans for covering a dying Trump administration that's threatening U.S. democracy as it gasps for survival.

The Financial Times' chief U.S. commentator told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" that President Donald Trump is trying to crack down on dissent and rally his hardcore base as the coronavirus and now nationwide protests against police brutality threaten his re-election chances.

"There are other Republican senators who are keeping silent because they know that what Trump is doing, what Trump is suggesting, is wrong," Luce said. they're scared of a backlash if they speak out."

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image