Quantcast
Connect with us

Seven facts about Boston gangster James ‘Whitey’ Bulger

Published

on

James “Whitey” Bulger was one of Boston’s most notorious and brutal gangsters before going on the run in 1994. He was captured in 2011 in Santa Monica, California, and convicted two years later of 11 murders and other crimes.

The following are seven facts about Bulger, who was found dead in a federal prison in West Virginia on Tuesday:

* After al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was killed by U.S. forces in Pakistan in 2011, Bulger succeeded him as No. 1 wanted fugitive on the FBI’s “Ten Most Wanted” list.

ADVERTISEMENT

* Miss Iceland of 1974 was responsible for Bulger’s capture. Anna Bjornsdottir, who had acted in U.S. television shows and commercials under the name Anna Bjorn, had lived near Bulger and girlfriend Catherine Greig in Santa Monica, California. While she was visiting Iceland, she saw a news report about the authorities’ hunt for Bulger. She recognized him as the quiet retiree she knew from Santa Monica and called the FBI, which arrested him in June 2011. Bjornsdottir later claimed a $2 million reward.

* One of the many aliases Bulger used while on the run was that of James Lawlor, a man who Bulger found living on the street in the Los Angeles area. The two men resembled each other so much that Bulger could use Lawlor’s driver’s license and other identity papers. In return, he paid Lawlor’s rent, according to the Boston Globe.

* In his 2013 trial, Bulger was convicted of 11 murders, including the strangulation of a woman. Jurors were unable to reach a verdict on a charge that he strangled a second woman. A witness said Bulger insisted that the women’s teeth be pulled to obscure their identity.

* Johnny Depp portrayed Bulger in the 2015 movie “Black Mass,” but the mobster’s lawyer said Bulger had no interest in seeing it and he refused to meet or correspond with Depp while the actor was preparing for the role.

ADVERTISEMENT

* Frank Costello, the character played by Jack Nicholson in the 2006 Academy Award-winning movie “The Departed,” was based loosely on Bulger.

* Bulger was imprisoned from 1956 to 1965 for bank robbery and spent part of that time imprisoned at the notorious Alcatraz federal penitentiary in San Francisco Bay. When police raided his Santa Monica apartment, they found several fiction and non-fiction books about criminals, including “Escape From Alcatraz.”

Writing and reporting by Bill Trott; editing by Diane Craft and G Crosse

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Public school employee pawned school-issued gun because he needed gas money: report

Published

on

A Florida man's need for gas money has landed him in jail.

"A former Pinellas County school guardian was arrested Wednesday and charged with five counts of false verification of ownership for pawning a handgun and other items issued to him by the Sheriff’s Office," the Tampa Bay Times reported Thursday.

It allegedly occurred multiple times.

"Detectives started looking into Erick Russell, 37, after he was arrested Sept. 5 on charges of domestic battery and false imprisonment," the newspaper reported. "They discovered Russell had pawned his sheriff’s-issued Glock 17 9 mm firearm and two magazines on three occasions during a one-month period from July 2 to Aug. 1."

Continue Reading

CNN

White House limiting staff access to Trump’s phone calls to prevent future whistleblowers: CNN

Published

on

On Thursday's edition of CNN's "The Situation Room," CNN White House correspondent Jim Acosta reported that President Donald Trump has grown furious about the state of White House leaks, and his officials are working to keep as many people in the administration as possible shut out from his phone calls with foreign leaders — precisely to avoid situations like the exploding DNI whistleblower scandal.

"As for the whistleblower complaint that's being kept from Congress, a senior administration official tells CNN as these leaks from these calls have angered Trump, top officials in the West Wing began to limit who could listen in on these conversations so as to tighten the circle of people in the know and what the president has been discussing in some of these phone calls with foreign leaders," said Acosta.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Congress, intel leaders clash over whistleblower report on Trump

Published

on

The US intelligence watchdog briefed lawmakers Thursday about the handling of a whistleblower complaint on alleged behavior by President Donald Trump, with a senior Democrat expressing alarm that the administration refuses to share the complaint with Congress.

The allegations, rejected by Trump as "presidential harassment," have set lawmakers on a collision course with the office of the Director of National Intelligence (DNI), which is refusing to share the details -- raising suspicions the top spy official might be improperly protecting the president.

According to a report by The Washington Post, which cited two unnamed former US officials for its story, a complaint filed by a US intelligence official stemmed from Trump's communications with a foreign leader and a "promise" allegedly made by the president.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image