Quantcast
Connect with us

Republicans were voted out in November — but they might be responsible for shutting down the government in December

Published

on

Republicans were trounced in the 2018 midterm elections, but they still have one month left in their terms with a slate of legislation to pass.

A report from the New York Times gave a list of what the GOP must accomplish in the few weeks they have before the holiday break. Republicans must reauthorize the Farm Bill, pass the “largest federal criminal justice rewrite in a generation,” the Times said, and fund President Donald Trump’s border wall. Therein lies the problem.

The president spent the past several months hammering his racist war against migrants seeking refuge from their gang-run Central American countries. One campaign ad was so over the top and littered with lies that even Fox News refused to run it. While Republicans begged Trump not to run a campaign on immigration and focus on economic successes, he refused. Americans gave the GOP their pink-slips in the greatest Democratic wave since the Nixon presidency.

Most Republicans didn’t care about the president’s bizarre obsession with building a wall that would cost billions and require foreign labor and materials to construct. For the few debt hawks left in Congress, increasing the deficit just to meet a political promise likely seems absurd. Yet, as the president begins his 2020 reelection campaign with the slogan, “Promises Kept,” he’ll have to spend the next two years delivering on campaign pledges his own party has refused to support.

“We have the will to put the money at the border for better security and combine it with some sensible reforms, including things like a path to citizenship, things like making sure that we have workers on our fields and in our factories that we need,” said Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) on ABC’s “This Week.” “But what I don’t think we should do is shut down the government. And that, again, is in his hands and his party’s hands.”

ADVERTISEMENT

If the budget comes to the president without the funding for his border wall, it’s unlikely he’ll sign it and begin another government shutdown. When speaking to reporters while on vacation at Mar-a-Lago, Trump said he didn’t want a shutdown but said he’s not sure what will happen. Americans aren’t likely to support a Republican Congress they just voted out shutting down their government for a border wall they don’t want.


Report typos and corrections to [email protected].

Send confidential news tips to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

BUSTED: CNN’s panel of women defending Trump’s racism were literally the ‘Trumpettes’

Published

on

CNN aired a panel that featured “Republican women” defending President Trump’s racist tweets, but failed to mention that they were actually part of a pro-Trump group whose members the network had interviewed in the past.

This article originally appeared at Salon.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Ben Carson is Donald Trump’s faulty human shield against accusations of racism

Published

on

Ben Carson is back in the news — after another long absence — because Donald Trump has once again been accused of racism.

This article originally appeared at Salon.

The secretary of Housing and Urban Development is the only African-American member of the president’s Cabinet, and is often trotted out to clean up after Trump makes a mess too obviously problematic for the media to ignore. While Trump has tried to spin his recent racist attacks on four progressive freshman congresswomen as a strategic maneuver meant to manipulate Democratic infighting to his advantage, Carson's re-emergence from his stupor should be a clear indication that the president’s team recognizes the damage that can be caused by his unforced errors.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

An illegal trend could be emerging after Trump let Kellyanne Conway off the hook for breaking federal law

Published

on

Federal workplaces are supposed to be free of politics, but a Trump administration appointee used a government forum Wednesday to express support for the president’s reelection.

At a conference on religious freedom hosted by the State Department, an official told the crowd of several hundred people that “hopefully he will be reelected,” referring to President Donald Trump.

It’s illegal for federal employees to engage in political activities while they are on the job.

“It’s a violation of the Hatch Act for a federal official, to say in her official capacity, to hope that the president will be reelected,” said Kathleen Clark, an expert on legal ethics at the Washington University in St. Louis.

Continue Reading
 
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

Join Me. Try Raw Story Investigates for $1. Invest in Journalism. Escape Ads.
close-image