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Even if there’s a deal — Republicans not showing up to work could lead to a government shutdown

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Republican officials have a few weeks left in the legislative session for 2018, but some haven’t been showing up to vote after the lost their seats in the November midterm elections, the New York Times reported. While that might not cause a problem in some years, this is not one of them.

The government sits on a cliff of another budget crisis just days before the Christmas holiday. A budget must be passed by Dec. 21, but if Republicans aren’t even showing up to work. It’s unclear how it is going to pass even if the GOP does reach a deal.

The greatest fear for the past several weeks has been that President Donald Trump announced he would be “proud” to shut down the government to ensure he scores funding for the border wall. When campaigning in 2016, Trump said Mexico would pay for the wall. In the past weeks, the president has also indicated that the border wall is already being built, which would mean the funding was already allocated for it. Still, he’s holding the government hostage for $5 billion.

Now the plot thickens. Even if Republicans are able to negotiate a budget, they might not have enough people to pass it due to absences.

The Times called it “the revenge of the lame ducks,” where Republican members that lost are now punishing the country with their own lazy bitterness.

“The uncertainty does not end there,” The Times continued. “With funding for parts of the government like the Department of Homeland Security set to lapse at midnight on Friday, Mr. Trump and top Republicans appear to have no definite plan to keep the doors open. It is clear that as Democrats uniformly oppose the president’s demand for $5 billion for his border wall, any bill that includes that funding cannot pass the Senate, and might face defeat in the House, too.”

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Trump is scheduled to go on vacation on the same day the government is scheduled to shut down. It’s entirely possible the Republican Congress and Senate could not fund the government and the president take off for vacation. It would leave more than 850,000 non-essential federal workers without a job to pay for holiday gifts for families and children.

“That’s me with my hands up in the air,” The Times quoted Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX). “There is no discernible plan — none that’s been disclosed.”

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GOP leaders in open warfare with Trump’s White House as another government shutdown looms

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According to a report in the Washington Post, GOP leaders are at an impasse with the White House on future budget concerns as President Donald Trump's chief of staff -- which is leading to fears of another government shutdown.

The report states, "GOP leaders have spent months cajoling President Trump in favor of a bipartisan budget deal that would fund the government and raise the limit on federal borrowing this fall, but their efforts have yet to produce a deal."

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Trump Twitter-snarls at ‘Impeachment Day’ protesters as the product of ‘Radical Left Democrats’

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President Donald Trump lashed out at Impeachment Day protesters on Twitter on Sunday morning, downplaying their efforts after seeing a report on Fox News.

Taking to Twitter the president wrote, "Yesterday was the Radical Left Democrats big Impeachment day. They worked so hard to make it something really big and special but had one problem - almost nobody showed up. “The Media admits low turnout for anti-Trump rallies ...saying enough. Democrat voters want to hear the politicians talking about issues. This is a huge distraction and will only help Donald Trump get elected. 'Greatest President since Ronald Reagan' said a counter-protester. LehighValleyLive."

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Trump’s first term: hits and misses

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"Promises made, promises kept," goes one of President Donald Trump's main 2020 reelection slogans. Is that true?

Here are some of the key policy hits and misses -- comparing his accomplishments to his promises -- from a tumultuous first term.

- HITS -

Economy:

The economy will be Trump's major selling point.

GDP grew 3.1 percent in the first quarter of 2019 and the last recession was a decade ago. Unemployment is at a 50-year low of 3.6 percent.

Trump's frequent claim that the economy is probably "the best" in US history is an exaggeration, though.

Economists see growing dangers, including exploding government debt and growing backlash from Trump's aggressive trade policies, especially with China.

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