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‘Republicans are truly scared for America’: Trump’s starting to lose his GOP support

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President Donald Trump/FOX News screen shot

Republican lawmakers have been critical of President Donald Trump’s sudden decision to pull troops from Syria, which also drove Defense Secretary James Mattis out of the administration — and that points to a looming problem for the White House.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) came close to criticizing the president for the Mattis departure, which he called “regrettable,” but other GOP lawmakers offered more pointed attacks, reported Axios.

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That signals a new problem for Trump, who’s enjoyed obsequious majorities in Congress for nearly two years, but will face a Democratic majority in the House.

“Once Republican lawmakers start rebuking the president publicly like this over policy, it makes it easier for them to say: ‘It’s not just Mueller or ethics, there are other concerns,'” said a former Trump aide who asked to be described as “a Trump ally.”

“Then it’s a slippery slope,” added the aide-turned-ally.

The White House assumes the president will be impeached by the newly Democratic House, which means Trump would need at least 34 Republicans to save him from conviction — and Axios said that support may be wavering.

“We talked all day yesterday with Republican officials, operatives and advisers who are truly scared for America,” wrote Axios co-founders Mike Allen and Jim VandeHei.

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Conservative Charlie Sykes tells Trump if he wants a pardon — he’ll have to admit he’s guilty first

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Editor and creator of The Bulwark, Charlie Sykes, told MSNBC's Joy Reid that the most "Trumpy" of things President Donald Trump could do is pardon himself ahead of leaving office in January.

After the president pardoned ret. Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, it sparked new anticipation on how Trump will protect himself from prosecution after leaving office. Trump was alleged to have committed at least ten acts of obstruction of justice by special counsel Robert Mueller. In that case, the Justice Department followed the internal rule that sitting presidents could not be indicted. Then, it stands to reason that the Justice Department would also follow a 1974 memo from the same Office of Legal Counsel that said a president could not pardon himself.

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‘It’s pathetic’: John Avlon slams Trump’s ‘delusional’ fantasy that he’s winning by ‘a lot’

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On CNN Wednesday, fact-checked John Avlon tore into President Donald Trump for his "delusional" claim that he's the real winner of the election.

"Let's not normalize that lie, because it is delusional," said Avlon. "It's the political equivalent of someone standing outside and saying that the sky is green, that the moon is made out of cheese and they're Napoleon. It's pathetic. It shows a fundamental disrespect for fact and reality, and frankly, his supporters as well. It's a symptom of an unwell person."

"We should not normalize it because it's just Trump lying trying to overturn the election as he wants to do. No, he's delusional," added Avlon. "People who follow him are being sucked into a vortex by someone who is struggling with his own soul."

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New evidence shows GOP’s David Perdue might have lied about his knowledge of stock trades: report

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On Wednesday, The Daily Beast reported that, despite Sen. David Perdue (R-GA) repeatedly claiming that his stock portfolio is managed by "outside" advisers, there is evidence that Perdue in fact personally made decisions on individual stock trades.

"On Wednesday, [The New York Times] reported that Perdue was investigated by the Department of Justice as it probed possible insider trading from a number of lawmakers over their investment activity around the coronavirus spread," reported Sam Brodey. "That investigation found that an executive at an Atlanta-based company called Cardlytics, where Perdue had previously served on the board, mistakenly sent Perdue a vague email in January saying changes were coming to the company."

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