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Democratic Mayor Pete Buttigieg launches 2020 White House campaign

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Pete Buttigieg, the Democratic mayor of South Bend, Indiana, launched an underdog 2020 bid for the White House on Wednesday, aiming to stand out as a problem-solving Midwestern outsider who would be the first openly gay nominee of a major U.S. political party.

The relatively unknown Buttigieg, 37, a two-term mayor of the Rust Belt city of about 100,000 people, has argued the party needs new leadership that can appeal to the working-class voters who deserted Democrats in favor of Republican Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential race.

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In an email and video to supporters, he sought to embrace fresh solutions for the future, in contrast to Trump’s nostalgia-driven message invoking an America of the past.

“My generation is the generation that experienced school shootings beginning when I was in high school, the generation that fought in the post-9/11 wars, the first generation to have to deal with the reality of climate change, and the first generation not to be better off than our parents materially – if nothing changes,” Buttigieg said.

“Only a forward focus – untethered from the politics of the past and anchored by our shared values – can change our national politics and our nation’s future.”

Buttigieg enters what is expected to be a crowded Democratic field of candidates vying for the right to challenge Trump, the likely Republican presidential nominee, in 2020. The mayor formed an exploratory committee to begin raising money and hiring staff to compete for the Democratic nomination.

He will face a tough task raising money and building a coalition of support in a race that will feature many candidates with greater name recognition and bigger donor networks.

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Other Democratic rivals for the nomination include U.S. Senators Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris and Kirsten Gillibrand as well as U.S. Representative Tulsi Gabbard and former San Antonio mayor and U.S. housing secretary Julian Castro.

On Wednesday, Buttigieg acknowledged the odds but touted his unique candidacy, saying, “At a moment like this, underdog campaigns will go further than the establishment would normally allow, when it comes to bold ideas that can truly meet the threats and opportunities coming our way.”

Buttigieg began building a national profile in 2017 with an unsuccessful run for chairman of the Democratic National Committee. Former President Barack Obama mentioned him in an interview shortly before leaving the White House as a young Democrat with a bright future.

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The Harvard graduate and former Rhodes Scholar returned to his hometown of South Bend and was elected mayor in 2012 at the age of 29. He served a seven-month Naval Reserve tour in Afghanistan while mayor and came out as gay in a 2015 column for the local paper. He married in June 2018.

As mayor of South Bend, a blue-collar town that is home to the University of Notre Dame, Buttigieg made redevelopment a top priority and was named mayor of the year in 2013 by the website GovFresh.com. He signaled his White House run in December when he announced he would not seek a third term as mayor.

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Reporting by Susan Heavey and Ginger Gibson; Editing by Catherine Evans, Colleen Jenkins, Jonathan Oatis and Steve Orlofsky


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DOJ closes insider trading investigations against three senators — but is still investigating Richard Burr: report

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On Tuesday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Justice Department officials are closing insider trading investigations into three senators — Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Kelly Loeffler (R-GA), and Jim Inhofe (R-OK).

However, a fourth probe, into insider trading allegations against Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC), is reportedly ongoing.

"The Federal Bureau of Investigation began the investigations two months ago, as reports emerged that several members of Congress, their spouses or their investment advisers sold hundreds of thousands of dollars in stock after lawmakers attended closed-door briefings about the threat posed by the new coronavirus," reported Aruna Viswanatha. "Some of those trades spared lawmakers as much as hundreds of thousands of dollars in losses as stocks sank by mid-March."

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White House insider says Trump spent Memorial Day weekend ‘in a rage’ – and sees himself as COVID-19’s biggest victim

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An inside source speaking to Vanity Fair's Gabriel Sherman says President Trump spent his Memorial Day weekend "in a f*cking rage" over what he sees is his unfair treatment over his response to the coronavirus outbreak. Even as the death toll neared 100,000 and unemployment swelled to over 38 million, Trump still sees himself as the victim, Sherman writes.

"Trump’s outburst reflected his growing frustration that, at this stage of the race, he is losing to Joe Biden," writes Sherman. "According to a Republican briefed on the campaign’s internal polls, Trump is trailing Biden by double digits among women over 50 in six swing states. 'Trump knows the numbers are bad. It’s why he’s thrashing about,' the Republican said."

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2020 Election

‘Scared of what will happen if he lets people vote’: Rights groups know why Trump panicked by mail-in ballots

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President Donald Trump on Tuesday alarmed pro-democracy advocates once again by elevating his attacks on voting rights by falsely claiming that mail-in ballots are inherently "rigged" and suggested the results of the November general election would be illegitimate if a vote-by-mail system is used.

The president—who has long railed against supposed "voter fraud" despite multiple studies showing cases of fraudulent voting are "vanishingly rare" and nowhere near common enough to swing election results—took aim in his tweets at California Gov. Gavin Newsom, who issued an executive order earlier this month to send mail-in ballots to every registered voter in the state for the November election.

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