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‘Here’s to reruns and YouTube’: Carol Burnett honored with eponymous Golden Globe award

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Beloved American comedian Carol Burnett was presented on Sunday with the first-ever Golden Globe recognizing a lifetime career in television, an award that was named after her.

The Carol Burnett award, to be presented every year, was established this year to celebrate the new golden age of television marked by high profile shows attracting Oscar-winning actors and directors.

Burnett, 85, the Emmy-winning star of the 1960s and 1970s TV sketch series “The Carol Burnett Show,” is regarded as a pioneer for women in comedy and one of the most decorated women in television.

Her parody of Scarlett O’Hara, wearing the “curtain-rod” dress, is widely considered one of the most memorable moments in U.S. comic television history.

“Sometimes I catch myself daydreaming about being young again and doing it all over,” Burnett said while accepting her award. “And then I bring myself up short when I realize how incredibly fortunate I was to be there at the right time.”

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Burnett dedicated her award “to all those who made my dreams come true and to all those out there who share the love I have for television.”

Famous for tugging her ear at the end of her performances, she is also known for her signature song, “I’m So Glad We Had This Time Together.”

“The Carol Burnett Show” won 23 Emmy Awards and Burnett went on to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, and become a Kennedy Center honoree.

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Burnett made her Broadway debut in “Once Upon a Mattress” in 1959 and has numerous film credits to her name, including the role of Miss Hannigan in the 1982 TV adaptation of musical “Annie.”

In recent years, she has made appearances on TV programs such as “Glee” and “Hot in Cleveland.”

Television has boomed in recent years, in part due to the arrival of experimental original content on streaming services like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu. According to a December study by the FX network, there were some 495 scripted shows on U.S. television in 2018 across cable, streaming and broadcast platforms.

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Yet Burnett noted that a variety show like hers would never be produced today due to the high cost of a full orchestra, dozens of costume changes and weekly guest stars.

“Today’s audiences might never know what they are missing,” she said. “So here’s to reruns and YouTube.”

Reporting by Jill Serjeant, Editing by Rosalba O’Brien


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School district threatens parents their children may be put in foster care over unpaid lunch bills

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A Luzerne County, Pennsylvania school district is under fire for sending letters to parents who owe money for their children's lunches. The letters threaten that if the bills remain unpaid their children could be removed from their homes and placed in foster care.

"Your child has been sent to school every day without money and without breakfast and/or lunch. This is a failure to provide your child with proper nutrition and you can be sent to Dependency Court for neglecting your child's right to food," the letter reads, as NBC News reported.

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Trump pits Apollo 11 astronauts against NASA chief — he thinks he understands space travel better

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President Donald Trump welcomed surviving Apollo 11 crew members Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins to the White House Friday, using the occasion to tell his space chief he would prefer to go straight to Mars without returning to the Moon.

It is a theme he had touched upon earlier this month in a tweet, and this time drew on the support of the two former astronauts, who are taking part in celebrations marking the 50th anniversary of their mission, to make his case to NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine.

"To get to Mars, you have to land on the Moon, they say," said Trump, without looking convinced.

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Babies born near oil and gas wells are up to 70% more likely to have congenital heart defects, new study shows

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Researchers at the University of Colorado studied pregnant women who are among the 17 million Americans living within a mile from an active oil or gas well

Proximity to oil and gas sites makes pregnant mothers up to 70 percent more likely to give birth to a baby with congenital heart defects, according to a new study.

Led by Dr. Lisa McKenzie at the University of Colorado, researchers found that the chemicals released from oil and gas wells can have serious and potentially fatal effects on babies born to mothers who live within a mile of an active well site—as about 17 million Americans do.

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