Quantcast
Connect with us

EPA to limit manmade chemicals in drinking water

Published

on

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will announce on Thursdays limits on how much toxic chemicals from cookware and carpeting are allowed in drinking water.

The agency will announce a plan to control a group of chemicals known as PFAS that are linked to cancer, liver and thyroid damage, and other health and fetal effects. The substances, which include PFOA and PFOS, are found in non-stick cookware, stain-resistant carpeting and other manmade materials.

ADVERTISEMENT

Acting administrator Andrew Wheeler will make the announcement at 9 a.m. EST (1400 GMT).

A draft report released in June by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry said the risk level for exposure to the chemicals should be at least seven to 10 times lower than the threshold recommended by the EPA.

The Trump administration had stopped the publication of the study earlier last year.

An EPA statement about Thursday’s announcement did not mention a specific level for the substances.

ABC News Live interviewed Wheeler on Wednesday and reported that drinking water systems around the country will be tested for the chemicals at lower levels than an earlier round of testing in 2012.

ADVERTISEMENT

Reporting by Mohammad Zargham; Editing by Lisa Shumaker


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump’s attempt to look tough backfires — and even Republicans seem to see the writing on the wall

Published

on

From the moment that protests against racist police violence started to spread from Minneapolis to the rest of the country (and the world), after a white police officer named Derek Chauvin killed an unarmed black man named George Floyd in a gruesome incident captured on video, it's been clear that Donald Trump thought this was exactly the Hail Mary he needed to win re-election. Trump has been desperate for a way to distract the country from the soaring death rate of the coronavirus pandemic (now at 108,000 and counting) and the 40 million left unemployed in the resulting economic collapse. He believed that a racist and sadistic backlash against the protesters was just the ticket.

Continue Reading

Facebook

Snapchat curbs Trump for inciting ‘racial violence’ as Facebook looks the other way

Published

on

Snapchat on Wednesday became the latest social network moving to curb the reach of inflammatory comments by US President Donald Trump, claiming the president has been inciting "racial violence."

The youth-focused social network said it would no longer promote Trump on its Discover platform for recommended content.

"We will not amplify voices who incite racial violence and injustice by giving them free promotion on Discover," a statement from Snapchat said.

The move came days after Twitter took an unprecedented stand by hiding a Trump post it said promoted violence, heating up the White House war with Silicon Valley and social media.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

‘Like George W. Bush after 9/11’: Kayleigh McEnany declares Trump Bible photo op a historic moment

Published

on

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Wednesday defended the use of force against protesters in order to clear way for President Donald Trump's photo op at St. John's Episcopal Church.

At her daily press briefing, McEnany was asked why it was necessary for Trump to walk to the church, where held up a Bible.

McEnany suggested that Trump's photo op had been a historic moment.

"This was a very important moment," she explained. "I would note that through all of time, we've seen presidents and leaders across the world who have had leadership moments and very powerful symbols that were important for a nation to see at any given time, to show a message of resilience and determination."

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image