Quantcast
Connect with us

US may slap new sanctions on Venezuela if aid convoys blocked: official

Published

on

The U.S. government could announce new sanctions to pressure Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro as early as next week unless his military defies orders to block convoys of humanitarian aid planned for this weekend, a senior administration official said on Friday.

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence and other leaders in the Western Hemisphere will meet in Bogota on Monday. Depending on what happens on Venezuela’s borders over the weekend, the leaders could dramatically boost aid pledges to the country – or take new steps to crack down on Maduro, the official told reporters.

“If there is any type of violence, or if there is any type of negative reaction from the hierarchy of the Venezuela armed forces, there may also be measures that are announced by the vice president and other countries in regards to closing even further the international financial circle,” the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Pence will lead the U.S. delegation to the meeting of the Lima Group regional bloc, and so far has an “open script” for what he will propose, the official said.

“He has the carrots, but he’s also ready with the sticks for those that promote or execute violence,” the official said. “That will be announced not only by the United States, but by the rest of the region’s democracies.”

The United States has stockpiled aid on Colombia’s border with Venezuela at the request of opposition leader Juan Guaido, whom Washington and other dozens of other Western governments have recognized as Venezuela’s legitimate president since Maduro held elections last year decried as fraudulent.

ADVERTISEMENT

Despite shortages of food and medicine, Maduro has denied there is a crisis in the country, and says the aid is aimed at undermining his government. He has ordered the country’s borders closed to keep the aid from entering.

Guaido and other opposition lawmakers have vowed to bring in aid on Saturday from the Brazilian town of Boa Vista as well as the Dutch Caribbean island of Curacao.

Tensions are running high and there has been some violence. Soldiers killed two people and injured 15 near the border with Brazil, witnesses said.

The U.S. official described the aid convoys as a key test for the Venezuelan military as its leaders weigh whether to obey Maduro or Guaido, who has asked the military to let it pass.

“It’s really the first order he gives to them as their commander in chief,” the U.S. official added.

Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Joe Biden promises to answer questions about his son’s overseas business dealings — after he’s elected

Published

on

Joe Biden refused to answer questions about his son's overseas business dealings.

The Democratic presidential frontrunner has been criticized for conducting diplomatic work as vice president in countries were his son, Hunter Biden, was engaged in business, but he refused at two campaign stops Monday to take questions about the controversy, reported ABC News.

Instead, his campaign promised that Biden would issue an executive order "on his first day in office" to "address conflicts of interest of any kind."

Continue Reading

Facebook

US Justice Dept. tells court migrant children in federal concentration camps don’t need soap or toothbrushes

Published

on

The Trump administration's Justice Dept. lawyers say migrant children detained in federal concentration camps do not need soap or toothbrushes despite a settlement agreement that requires the U.S. Government to keep them in "safe and sanitary" facilities. The DOJ also argues that the children, detained in the Southern border camps, can continue to sleep on cold concrete floors in overcrowded cells without being in violation of the agreement.

The DOJ made the argument Tuesday before a three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit, Courthouse News reports, noting the judges appeared "incredulous" with the government's claims.

Continue Reading
 

CNN

CNN panelist stumps host with Trump logic: ‘You can statistically say anything but I don’t see it’

Published

on

A Trump supporter on Thursday brushed off statistics showing that hate crimes have been rising since President Donald Trump's election by claiming that he has not personally seen any additional hate crimes.

During a CNN voter panel, host Alisyn Camerota quoted from official statistics showing a significant increase in hate crimes committed since Trump's upset victory in 2016.

Trump supporter Darrell Wimbley, however, wasn't buying it and he cited his own personal experiences to prove his point.

"You can say that, but I truly don't believe it because I don't see it," he said. "I can statistically say anything but I don't see it."

Continue Reading
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

I need your help.

Investigating Trump's henchmen is a full time job, and I'm trying to bring in new team members to do more exclusive reports. We have more stories coming you'll love. Join me and help restore the power of hard-hitting progressive journalism.

TAKE A LOOK
close-link

Investigating Trump is a full-time job, and I want to add new team members to do more exclusive reports. We have stories coming you'll love. Join me and go ad-free, while restoring the power of hard-hitting progressive journalism.

TAKE A LOOK
close-link