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GOP congressman won’t say if he thinks a white society is superior to a nonwhite society

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Rep. Steve King (R-IA) seems keenly aware that his longtime personal style of espousing open white supremacy is starting to wreck his political career.

Perhaps for that reason, at a recent town hall event, King tried a slightly different tack as The New York Times reported:

“Do you think a white society is superior to a nonwhite society?” Mary Lavelle, 63, asked, testing his reputation for white supremacist sympathies.

“I don’t have an answer for that. That’s so hypothetical,” Mr. King, Republican of Iowa, told her. “I’ll say this, America is not a white society — it has never been a completely white society. We came here and joined the Native Americans.”

He continued: “I’ve long said that a baby can be lifted out of a cradle anywhere in the world and brought into any home in America, whatever the color of the folks in that household, and they can be raised to be American as any other. And I believe that every one of us, every one of us, is created in God’s image.”

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Leaving aside the ridiculousness of King’s claim that we “joined the Native Americans” when in fact the colonists and their descendants conducted a brutal genocide against them, King has not “long said” that a baby from anywhere in the world could be raised American. In fact, he famously said the exact opposite in 2017, warning that “We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.”

For years, King was given total impunity by his Republican colleagues to engage in appalling racism, from claiming that most young Mexicans are drug mules to giving an interview to a Nazi-founded Austrian group during a Holocaust education trip. The last straw, however, was an interview with The New York Times in January, in which he demanded to know when “white nationalist” and “white supremacist” became offensive terms. Finally recognizing King was a political liability, Republicans condemned him and stripped him of his House committee assignments.

Now, it seems, King is trying to reinvent his public image. But if his answer on “white societies” is representative of his efforts, it won’t end well for him.

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Here’s the insidious role Sean Hannity played in derailing Al Franken’s political career

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The U.S. Senate lost one of its most prominent liberals when Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota, dogged by sexual harassment allegations, announced his resignation in December 2017. Some of Franken’s defenders believed the Democratic Party was too quick to throw him under the bus; other Democrats stressed that in light of the #MeToo movement, his resignation was absolutely necessary. Franken’s political downfall is the subject of an in-depth report by the New Yorker’s Jane Mayer, who describes — among many other things — the role that Fox News’ Sean Hannity played in the media firestorm.

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Commentary

The media got it wrong: There’s no evidence GOP support for Trump improved after his racist outburst

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One of the most popular articles last week involved claims that polls showed Republicans had increased their support of President Trump.  But a closer analysis of the data reveals that any increase in support was within the margin of error.  So the polls couldn’t conclude that GOP support for President Trump had gone up or down.

Polls are tricky creatures.  We either give them near god-like status, or discount them entirely, often depending on whether they show us what we want.

I remember the movie “Machete,” where an opportunistic Texas politician fakes his own shooting.  Within five minutes of that story breaking, the news anchor reported that the politician had drastically improved his standing in the polls.  Surveys don’t work that way.

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Activism

Rep. Rashida Tlaib defies Trump in NAACP speech: ‘I’m not going nowhere, not until I impeach this president’

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Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) defiantly insisted on Monday that she would be in Congress until President Donald Trump is impeached.

At the 2019 annual NAACP convention, the announcer noted that Tlaib is a member of the four congresswomen known as The Squad who have recently been told by Trump to "go back" home.

Tlaib began her remarks by alluding to the president's attack.

"I’m not going nowhere, not until I impeach this president," she shouted.

Watch the video below from the NAACP.

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