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He opposes same-sex marriage and gay judges and he’s now one step closer to becoming a federal judge

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Attorney Howard Nielson has argued that same-sex couples should not have the right to marry because marriage should be reserved for couples who will procreate – produce children. He’s argued that same-sex couples would not be capable parents. He argued in defense of California’s Prop 8. And he’s argued that the judge who decided California’s Prop 8 was unconstitutional was not capable of delivering an impartial ruling because he is gay and in a committed, long-term same-sex relationship.
Nielson has also argued against equal opportunity and affirmative action, argued that the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional, argued to uphold laws designed to make it even harder for women to obtain an abortion, and argued against common-sense gun laws designed to increase public safety.

He has even defended torture and defended one of the authors of the infamous “torture memos” that President George W. Bush used to order the infliction of so-called “enhanced interrogation techniques,” including waterboarding, which is an international war crime. His remarks, (and his own “torture memo,”) in defense of his then-colleague were in support of the argument allowing torture.

All that’s just for starters.

Federal judges, and even the U.S. Supreme Court, have handed down rulings in opposition to the arguments he has made.

Lambda Legal produced this video in opposition to Nielson’s nomination last year:

On Tuesday all U.S. Senate Republicans (except Sen. Susan Collins) voted 52-47 to invoke cloture – end debate to allow a vote – on the nomination of Howard Nielson to become a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Utah.

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The full Senate will vote on Nielson’s nomination shortly. He is expected to be confirmed.

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Here are 5 questions Robert Mueller must answer during his Congressional hearings

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Former special counsel Robert Mueller will be testifying publicly before Congress on July 17th, the chairs of the House Judiciary and House Intelligence committees announced on Tuesday.

The special counsel had fought against testifying but was subpoenaed to compel his attendance.

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‘Finally #MuellerTime’: Internet celebrates Mueller’s upcoming public testimony on Russia investigation

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On Tuesday, the House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees announced that special counsel Robert Mueller will publicly testify about the Russia investigation's findings before Congress.

Quickly, the internet reacted to the news:

This will really matter, even if Mueller merely repeats what he said in his report. The vast majority of Americans have never read it. https://t.co/ZuRHqbRAEv

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Robert Mueller subpoena isn’t a ‘friendly’ one: Intelligence Committee Chair tells Maddow

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Intelligence Committee chair Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) joined with Judiciary Chair Jerry Nadler (D-NY) in subpoenaing former special counsel Robert Mueller. But according to Schiff, this wasn't exactly an agreement the committees came to with Mueller or the special counsel's investigators.

"We consistently communicated our committees' intentions to issue these subpoenas if necessary and we now understand it is necessary to do so. Should we see this as a friendly subpoena that Robert Mueller believed had to be issued before he could accept an invitation to testify?" asked MSNBC host Rachel Maddow.

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