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Biden tells billionaires that things wouldn’t change under his administration

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Don’t worry, billionaires: your standard of living won’t change under a Joe Biden administration.

That’s the message the Democratic frontrunner delivered to donors Tuesday as he continued a fundraising trip in New York that saw him on Monday tell a room of wealthy Wall Streeters “you guys are great” and ask a Trump-loving supermarket magnate for support.

In Biden’s comments Tuesday, the former vice president told a room of 100 of the New York financial elite, including bankers Robert Rubin and Roger Altman, both of whom worked in the Treasury Department under Democratic administrations, that he wasn’t their enemy. According to Bloomberg reporter Jennifer Epstein, Biden took pains to separate himself from the rest of the field in his comments.

“Remember, I got in trouble with some of the people on my team, on the Democratic side, because I said, you know, what I’ve found is rich people are just as patriotic as poor people,” said Biden. “Not a joke. I mean, we may not want to demonize anybody who’s made money.”

But, said Biden, their taxes might have to be raised a little to achieve some of his legislative goals—though he assured the members of the 1 percent in attendance at the Upper East Side Carlyle Hotel that under his plan, the increase wouldn’t even be noticeable.

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“The truth of the matter is, you all, you all know, you all know in your gut what has to be done,” said Biden. “We can disagree in the margins but the truth of the matter is it’s all within our wheelhouse and nobody has to be punished.”

“No one’s standard of living will change,” said Biden. “Nothing would fundamentally change.”

A number of observers on Twitter seized on that message as emblematic of Biden’s campaign strategy in general.

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“Biden 2020: ‘Nothing would fundamentally change,'” said financial reform advocate Alexis Goldstein.

Biden’s phrasing “might be the most honest thing he’s said since he defended segregated schools,” writer Nathan Bernhardt tweeted.

Lawyer Matthew Cortland agreed.

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“When someone tells you who they are,” said Cortland, “believe them.”


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2020 Election

Showing fired-up small-dollar donors, democratic fundraising platform ActBlue processed record $420 Million so far this year

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"We're seeing millions of donors, record-breaking totals every quarter, and a rapidly-growing small-dollar army that is ready to help Democrats take back everything from school boards to the White House next year."

Online fundraising platform ActBlue said Wednesday that 3.3 million supporters gave over $420 million so far this year to roughly 8,700 Democratic campaigns and left-leaning organizations, a haul it said was a testament to the surging "small dollar army" of donors.

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2020 Election

Trump’s racists attacks are ‘central to 2020 strategy’ – expect ‘more, not less race-baiting madness’: Report

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President Donald Trump's racist attacks on four progressive Democratic Congresswomen are not "improvisational madness," but rather calculated "race-baiting" that is "central to his 2020 strategy."

So reports Axios, citing sources "close to Trump" who "predict more, not less, of the race-baiting madness."

Why?

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2020 Election

Two Texas Republicans in Congress were outraised as national Democratic offensive kicks off in Texas

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Two potentially vulnerable Texas Republicans in Congress were outraised — and a few others saw seriously funded challengers — as the first major fundraising deadline passed in a cycle where national Democrats have built an expansive battlefield here, targeting six seats.

In the second quarter, Rep. Pete Olson, R-Sugar Land, fell short of Democratic challenger Sri Preston Kulkarni, $378,000 to $421,000. Rep. Kenny Marchant, R-Coppell, raised less than Democratic opponent Kim Olson, $225,000 to $279,000, before making a large loan to his campaign. And a few other GOP incumbents posted strong numbers — but so did Democrats running to unseat them, in a couple cases outpacing the officeholders after they entered the race mid-fundraising cycle.

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