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‘Delusional’ Tom Cotton pummeled for believing armed conflict with Iran would be as simple as ‘two strikes’ and done

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Calling him “delusional,” a Washington Post columnist ripped into Arkansas Republican Senator Tom Cotton on Monday for boasting during a Sunday “Face the Nation” interview that a war with Iran would be relatively painless and could be accomplished with just “two strikes.”

Appearing on the CBS show over the weekend, Cotton told host Margaret Brennan that the U.S. needs to unleash its military might on Iran because Donald Trump’s administration has claimed they are behind attacks on two oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz.

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“These unprovoked attacks on commercial shipping warrant a retaliatory military strike,” Cotton asserted.

Referring to Cotton’s previous comments on PBS’s “Firing Line,” that a war with Iraq could be won with“Two strikes — the first strike and the last strike,” columnist James Downie was incredulous — particularly since Cotton served in the Middle East.

“This is, to put it mildly, delusional. Cotton, who served in Iraq, surely knows that tens of thousands of troops were insufficient to ‘win’ that war,” Downie wrote. “Iran is more than three times larger than and about twice as populous as Iraq. Even the military plans ordered up by hard-liners such as national security adviser John Bolton envision as many as 120,000 troops deployed to the region.”

The WaPo columnist went on to add, “Nothing in U.S. history suggests that ‘two strikes’ would be enough or that any military intervention in the region would be anything other than a foolish return to a quagmire. Oddly, even Cotton has admitted several times, including on Sunday, that the most recent major U.S. intervention in Libya was unwise.”

Downies went to praise Trump for being reticent about starting up a war with Iran — despite the urging of Bolton and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo — while saying Cotton’s warmongering is treading on dangerous ground.

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“In a better timeline, younger Republican politicians, having internalized the lessons of Iraq and Afghanistan, not to mention many other U.S. interventions overseas, would be encouraging the president’s caution. Instead, we are stuck with Cotton and other young Republican senators such as Ben Sasse (Neb.) who are all too happy with bellicosity toward Iran,” he wrote before lamenting, “So much for a country learning from its mistakes.”

You can read the whole piece here.

 

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Giuliani can’t whine about ‘fair play’ when his boss is denying electoral fairness to the American people: columnist

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President Donald Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani has been raging against the impeachment investigation that came about, in large part, due to his own behavior. On Tuesday, he wrote an op-ed for the Wall Street Journal lamenting that the impeachment process is "unprecedented, constitutionally questionable, and an affront to American fair play."

As Danielle Allen wrote for the Washington Post on Wednesday, Giuliani wanting to talk about "fair play" is a rich proposition.

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Trump made a ‘huge mistake’ talking to reporters about impeachment: Mueller prosecutor Andrew Weissmann

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One of former special counsel Robert Mueller's top prosecutors explained on MSNBC how President Donald Trump made a "huge mistake" on Wednesday.

Andrew Weissmann, who is now an MSNBC legal analyst, was interviewed by Chuck Todd on "Meet the Press Daily."

The former federal prosecutor says Trump committed a blunder by denying a call with a Gordon Sondland staffer.

"Why is that?" Todd asked.

"Because he now can’t rebut it," Weissman replied.

"He has now said I don’t remember that phone call. So you’re going to have Sondland testifying to it. You’re going to have a staffer testifying to it," he explained. "If [Trump] doesn’t like their testimony, he’s going to have to say, 'Oh, now I remember that I didn’t say that.'"

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Republicans want Americans to believe Trump cared deeply — about something he never mentioned

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One of the main points made by Republicans during the House hearings on the impeachment claimed that President Donald Trump cared so deeply about corruption in Ukraine that he was holding back the funding. It wasn't bribery because it was all about legitimate foreign policy, according to Trump and the Republicans in Congress.

Their greatest problem is that Trump has never held back speaking out about something he cared for. As the Washington Post noted, the argument doesn't stand up.

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