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New York Times admits they ‘downplayed’ the rape allegation against Trump

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On Monday, The New York Times issued a mea culpa for the nature of their coverage of the allegation by advice columnist E. Jean Carroll that President Donald Trump raped her in a department store in the 1990s.

“After an article last week reported the advice columnist E. Jean Carroll’s rape allegations against President Trump, some readers accused The Times of downplaying the story,” wrote staff editor Lara Takenaga. “Many have written to ask us why we didn’t give the allegations more attention on our website and in print … Some questioned whether the lack of prominence showed too much deference to the president’s denials, or whether it even suggested misogyny or an unwillingness to believe a victim’s account.”

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Executive editor Dean Baquet reportedly agreed that the coverage was inadequate, but denied that the paper was in any way deferential to the president.

“In The Times‘s reporting on the Weinstein and O’Reilly cases, editors developed an informal set of guidelines for when The Times would publish such allegations. Those guidelines include locating sources outside those mentioned by the accusers who not only corroborate the allegations but also are willing to go on the record,” stated the analysis. “But the Carroll story, Mr. Baquet said, was different because the allegations were already receiving broad attention, with New York Magazine publishing an excerpt from Ms. Carroll’s book detailing the incident.”

Ultimately, the Times concluded that the different circumstances of this case meant that it should have been covered more aggressively than it otherwise would have been.

“In retrospect, Mr. Baquet said, a key consideration was that this was not a case where we were surfacing our own investigation — the allegations were already being discussed by the public,” said the analysis. “The fact that a well-known person was making a very public allegation against a sitting president ‘should’ve compelled us to play it bigger.'”

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The real DC showdown: Pelosi vs. Trump

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Love her or hate her, Nancy Pelosi is a classy, effective and persuasive Speaker.

Repeatedly through the Trump presidency, she has stepped up to offer just the right gesture, just the right opinion, just the right level of evenness or passion that proves effective in making the role of leadership believable.

Along the way, she manages to count votes, keep her caucus in line and stand up for a totally understandable and admirable bar of justice and American value, for the Constitution itself.

Her statements yesterday in outlining in measured tones the reasoning that Donald Trump’s actions have left “no choice” but moving forward towards impeachment were well-said, logical, and belied the emotion behind them.

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Trump’s tax cuts and tariffs have been even more disastrous than skeptics predicted: Paul Krugman

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In a column celebrating the first anniversary of Donald Trump declaring himself "Tariff Man," New York Times columnist and Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman attempted to explain the president's love of tariffs and noted that the negative economic impact in the past year has surpassed even the worst expectations.

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Trump’s undermining of efforts to fight Putin detailed in ex-CIA agent’s disturbing new column

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A recently retired CIA agent reveals that President Donald Trump was a "wild card" that prevented a full-scale effort to combat Russian aggression against the U.S. and its allies.

Marc Polymeropoulos, who retired from the agency in June, said in column posted at Just Security that the CIA issued an informal "call to arms" in the wake of Kremlin interference in the 2016 election, but those efforts were hampered by Trump's relationship with Russia's president Vladimir Putin.

"The Call to Arms required a whole-of-agency effort to counter the Kremlin," Polymeropoulos wrote. "It involved moving resources and personnel inside CIA. Most importantly, it required a change in mindset, similar to what occurred within the Intelligence Community after 9/11, that an 'all-hands-on-deck' approach was required."

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