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This explains why Trump picked a fight with the four Congresswomen of color: analysis

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On one hand, President Donald Trump almost certainly chose to mark out Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), Rashida Tlaib (D-MI), Ilhan Omar (D-MN), and Ayanna Pressley (D-MA) because of his own deep-seated racism.

But there is likely another reason he is doing it, wrote Aaron Blake of the Washington Post‘s “The Fix” on Wednesday: because his core voters hate them as much as he does.

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Blake cited a new The Economist/YouGov poll of 2016 Trump voters’ opinions on several politicians. “As you peruse it, it becomes clear that the conventional wisdom about why Trump picked these targets is right: They were ripe for motivating the GOP base … All of them are better known among Republicans than Democrats, which suggests that a steady stream of coverage in conservative media has elevated them as potential Democratic bogeywomen. Trump is tilling fertile soil. And in fact, they might already be his most effective foils.”

The poll found that among Trump voters who have heard of the congresswomen, Ocasio-Cortez has 80.4 percent unfavorable ratings, Omar has 80.2 percent unfavorable, and Tlaib has 76.3 percent unfavorable (Pressley was not polled). For comparison, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) is 76.3 percent unfavorable with this group, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) is 76.1 percent, Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) is 74.4 percent, and former Vice President Joe Biden is 58.9 percent.

This could go a long way to explaining why another poll showed that Trump’s approval actually went up among Republicans amid the controversy over his racist statements, even as it went down with everyone else.

“Trump has shown before that he’s perfectly willing to demean his political opponents, especially women (Clinton) and racial minorities (Obama), in intensely personal ways,” concluded Blake. “What happens when his targets are both of those things? It seems we’re about to find out, over and over again.”

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Trump is trying Middle East Peace plan 2.0 after the first one flopped

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President Donald Trump is scheduled to submit his second Middle East peace plan after the first one senior son-in-law Jared Kushner came up with didn't go over very well.

"We will get this done," Trump claimed in May 2017.

“We'll start a process which hopefully will lead to peace,” Trump said. “Over the course of my lifetime, I've always heard that perhaps the toughest deal to make is the deal between the Israelis and the Palestinians. Let's see if we can prove them wrong, okay?”

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Rage-filled Trump has crippled his presidency because he can’t let go of a grudge no matter how small: report

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According to a report in Politico, many of Donald Trump's problems are the direct result of his inability to get over the smallest of slights leading him to make poor decisions because he can't see his way to let go of a grudge.

The report notes, "Whether in the privacy of his clubs or out on the campaign trail, the president can’t help but hold onto a grudge. Even as Trump heads into an election year with a record that he claims ranks him among the best presidents of all time, political grievances continue to drive everything from policy decisions to rally speeches to some of the biggest scandals of his presidency — including his impeachment."

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George Conway reveals Trump is being shunned by law firms because young lawyers ‘want nothing to do with him’

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Conservative attorney George Conway asserted in a column over the weekend that President Donald Trump's history of mistreating law firms is catching up with him.

In a Sunday op-ed for The Washington Post, Conway explains that Trump is now faced with sparse choices for legal representation in his impeachment trial after years of not paying attorneys and generally being a bad client.

Pointing to Trump's choice of Alan Dershowitz and Kenneth Starr, Conway writes:

?The president has consistently encountered difficulty in hiring good lawyers to defend him. In 2017, after Robert S. Mueller III became special counsel, Trump couldn’t find a high-end law firm that would take him as a client. His reputation for nonpayment preceded him: One major Manhattan firm I know had once been forced to eat bills for millions in bond work it once did for Trump. No doubt other members of the legal community knew of other examples.

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