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Terror plot thwarted after white supremacist leaves phone on bus — and gets busted: feds

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Federal agents believe the arrest of a Colorado child pornography suspect may have stopped a domestic terror plot.

Wesley David Gilreath was charged Tuesday with possession of child pornography, but federal authorities said his arrest was also intended to potentially stop a domestic terror attack, reported the Daily Camera.

The 29-year-old Boulder man is suspected of writing an online guide to committing violent hate crimes against refugee centers, synagogues and mosques.

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A magistrate judge ordered Gilreath held without bond on the pornography charge, and he remains under investigation for other potential crimes.

An FBI agent confirmed in January that Gilreath had posted a so-called “Montana Hunting Guide” online targeting Jews, Muslims, Montana National Guard facilities, Bureau of Land Management offices and a refugee center, according to court documents.

He was not arrested at that time, but he fell under federal scrutiny again in May after leaving his father’s iPhone — which he had been using — on a bus.

The phone contained thousands of photographs of sexual violence involving children and animals, investigators said.

Prosecutors found evidence that Gilreath had searched for a book about gaining children’s trust, and he also had white supremacist literature and paraphernalia, as well as lists of local mosque and synagogue addresses.

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Gilreath had recently attempted to purchase a gun and previously failed multiple times to appear for court hearings.

He blamed his father after Gilreath was denied May 24 for a gun purchase by a Boulder retailer.

“You’ve permanently ruined my ability to buy a gun in CO and other states,” he texted his father, according to investigators.

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Trump pushed for a sweetheart tax deal on his first hotel — it’s cost NYC $410,068,399 and counting

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In 1975, New York City was run-down and on the verge of bankruptcy. Twenty-nine-year-old Donald Trump saw an opportunity. He wanted to acquire and redevelop the dilapidated Commodore Hotel in midtown Manhattan next to Grand Central Terminal.

Trump had bragged to the executive controlling the sale that he could use his political connections to get tax breaks for the deal.

The executive was skeptical. But the next day, the executive was invited into Trump’s limousine, which ushered him to City Hall. There, he met with Donald’s father Fred and Mayor Abe Beame, to whom the Trumps had given lavishly.

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Mitch McConnell’s impeachment rules pass by 53-47 vote — here’s what happens next in Trump’s senate trial

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The US Senate voted along party lines on Tuesday to set the rules for President Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial.

By a 53 to 47 vote, the Republican-controlled Senate approved an "organizing resolution" for the trial proposed by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Before approving the rules, the Senate voted down several amendments proposed by Democrats seeking to subpoena witnesses and documents from the White House and State Department.

These are the next phases in Trump's impeachment trial, just the third of a president in US history:

- Opening arguments -

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Chief Justice Roberts admonishes lawyers at Senate impeachment trial

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Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court John Roberts made his first major intervention in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial shortly before 1 a.m. Wednesday morning.

After House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) finished his closing arguments on why former National Security Advisor John Bolton should testify, the White House team went on the attack. Yelling and demanding apologies, the president's team was more animated than they'd been all night. Roberts then admonished the House and White House on their language.

Claiming the Senate is the "world's greatest deliberative body" -- despite what he had witnessed during 12 hours of the impeachment trial -- Roberts complained about language that was "not conducive to civil discourse."

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