Quantcast
Connect with us

‘A holy sh*t moment’: Navy SEAL who led operation that killed Osama bin Laden warns of China’s growing dominance

Published

on

Former Navy SEAL Adm. William McRaven, who became famous after it was revealed he headed the operation that killed Osama bin Laden, warned about China’s military capabilities during a Council on Foreign Relations event this Wednesday, Business Insider reports.

According to McRaven, China’s buildup is a “holy sh*t” moment for the US, adding that it’s time to “make sure that the American public knows that now is the time to do something” in the interest of national security.

ADVERTISEMENT

A report released by the CFR on Wednesday says that China is emerging as the most significant rival to the US when it comes to defense, research, and technology. The report also stated that China is asserting its dominance in the Pacific and is also ramping up hacking operations and intellectual property theft.

McRaven warned that the “gap” between American and Chinese progress is “narrowing.”

From Business Insider:

In some cases, China is surpassing the US, according to the report — for example, in the commercialization of 5G, a necessary component of high-speed communication. What’s more, Chinese-built 5G networks could pose significant risks to US national security, as evidenced by the US’s contentious relationship with the Chinese tech company Huawei.

China’s intellectual-property theft is a significant cause for concern, and one that the US is confronting, the report said. Between October and December, the US Department of Justice indicted Chinese hackers and intelligence personnel on charges of intellectual-property theft three times.

McRaven added that problem isn’t going to go away.

ADVERTISEMENT

“…it’s just going to get harder as we get further into the future,” he said.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

US Supreme Court agrees to decide if taxpayer funded religious adoption agencies can discriminate against LGBTQ people

Published

on

The U.S. Supreme Court has announced it will hear a case that could determine if taxpayer-funded religious organizations, including adoption and foster care agencies, can legally discriminate against LGBTQ people. Monday morning the conservative-majority court agreed to hear Fulton v. Philadelphia, which is being litigated by the far right wing Becket Fund for Religious Liberty.

Catholic Social Services is claiming it has a First Amendment right to discriminate against same-sex couples and LGBTQ people, – including refusing to allow them to adopt or foster children – while still accepting taxpayer funds.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Julian Assange lawyer tells court: After pardon fell through, Trump administration resorted to ‘extortion’

Published

on

An attorney for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange accused the Trump administration of extortion in a London court on Monday.

The WikiLeaks attorney appeared at Woolwich Crown Court along with U.S. prosecutors, who argued that Assange should be extradited the United States, where he faces 18 charges and up to 175 years in jail.

Attorneys for Assange previously told the court that former Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) tried to broker a pardon deal between the White House and Assange if he would agree to say that Russia was not the source of hacked Democratic Party emails.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Black teens shocked after basketball announcer calls their names ‘disgusting’

Published

on

A longtime announcer at high-school basketball games in Oklahoma sparked outrage last week when he said that black players on the Crooked Oak High School lady's basketball team had "disgusting" names.

Local news station KFOR reports that the announcer made the remarks during a game between Crooked Oak and rival Newkirk High School on Friday.

In a video taken at the game, the announcer can be heard saying, "The Crooked Oak Lady Ruff Necks, now their names are pretty disgusting."

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image