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Congress, intel leaders clash over whistleblower report on Trump

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The US intelligence watchdog briefed lawmakers Thursday about the handling of a whistleblower complaint on alleged behavior by President Donald Trump, with a senior Democrat expressing alarm that the administration refuses to share the complaint with Congress.

The allegations, rejected by Trump as “presidential harassment,” have set lawmakers on a collision course with the office of the Director of National Intelligence (DNI), which is refusing to share the details — raising suspicions the top spy official might be improperly protecting the president.

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According to a report by The Washington Post, which cited two unnamed former US officials for its story, a complaint filed by a US intelligence official stemmed from Trump’s communications with a foreign leader and a “promise” allegedly made by the president.

The foreign leader involved was not identified by the Post.

The whistleblower filed a complaint with the inspector general of the intelligence community (IC IG), Michael Atkinson, who acknowledged that he considered it a credible matter of “urgent concern” that necessitated notifying congressional oversight committees.

But during a three-hour closed-door briefing, Atkinson told the House Intelligence Committee that the acting DNI, Joseph Maguire, has barred him from providing details of the complaint to Congress.

“That whole purpose is being frustrated here because the Director of National Intelligence has made the unprecedented decision not to share the complaint with Congress,” the committee’s chairman, Democrat Adam Schiff, told reporters after the briefing.

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Schiff said, without revealing the source of his information, that the Department of Justice has been involved in the decision to withhold the whistleblower’s complaint.

“We do not know, because we cannot get an answer to the question, about whether the White House is also involved in preventing this information from coming to Congress,” he said.

Schiff made public Thursday a letter from Atkinson in which the intelligence inspector general said that he and the acting DNI “are at an impasse over this issue.”

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– ‘Crisis of confidence’ –

Schiff told the DNI in a letter Wednesday that his decision to ignore the August 12 complaint has precipitated a broader “crisis of confidence and trust” that threatens the integrity of the intelligence community’s whistleblower process, “with potentially far-reaching consequences.”

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Trump dismissed the concerns in a Twitter thread, calling the story “fake news,” and noting that any time he speaks with foreign leaders by phone he is well aware that there are likely “many people” listening from US agencies.

“Knowing all of this, is anybody dumb enough to believe that I would say something inappropriate with a foreign leader while on such a potentially ‘heavily populated’ call,” he said.

“I would only do what is right anyway, and only do good for the USA!”

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House Democrat Jackie Speier emerged from the Atkinson briefing expressing concern about what she called “the violation of the law” regarding failure to send the whistleblower complaint to Congress.

“It’s deeply troubling,” she told reporters.

Maguire, meanwhile, has agreed to testify in an open session before the committee next Thursday.

Trump had communications or interactions with at least five foreign leaders in the five weeks preceding the complaint, including a phone call with Russian President Vladimir Putin on July 31, according to the Post.

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During that period, Trump also met with the prime ministers of Pakistan and the Netherlands and the emir of Qatar, and received two letters from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, it said.

Trump has had an uneasy relationship with the US intelligence community since taking office and has frequently criticized their work.


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Elise Stefanik was once touted as a GOP ‘moderate’ — but she’s gone full Trumpian with impeachment

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Rep. Elise Stefanik of New York State is often described as a “moderate Republican” who hasn’t been afraid to part company with President Donald Trump at times. But journalists Alayna Treene and Stef W. Kight, in a November 20 article for Axios, assert that when it comes to impeachment, the congresswoman has become an aggressive Trump defender.

Stefanik, Treene and Kight note, has “built a reputation as a moderate” and “opposed President Trump on Vladimir Putin, women, tariffs, the travel ban and the border wall.” But the Axios reporters go on to say that Stefanik’s “fierce defense of Trump during the impeachment hearings — along with her attacks on House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff — has made her a champion among the pro-Trump community.”

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Are Republicans even trying to defend Trump? Or just doing Vladimir Putin’s bidding?

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Last Friday, President Trump made the huge error of committing an impeachable offense while a House impeachment hearing was underway, by seeking to intimidate former Marie Yovanovitch, the former ambassador to Ukraine — who he had already threatened during the famous July phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. He did it again over the weekend with this insult toward Jennifer Williams, an aide to Vice President Mike Pence, who heard that call.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1196155347117002752

 

Someone seems to have gotten through to Trump since then, because he didn't personally insult or threaten the witnesses during Tuesday's marathon hearings. He did, however, retweet insults by others and issued an official White House tweet questioning the integrity of the National Security Counsel's Ukraine expert, Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman. In his one appearance before the cameras, he made a snotty observation that Vindman had worn his U.S. Army uniform to the hearing, implying — as did several Republican members of the House Intelligence Committee — that he was being theatrical. There was a time when they would have swooned over any military dress uniform covered with salad. Now they only revere those who commit war crimes.

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Rex Tillerson says Trump’s Ukraine scheme was wrong

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Former secretary of state Rex Tillerson has criticized alleged actions that have triggered an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, saying using US influence for personal gain is "wrong."

Tillerson, a former oil executive who was unceremoniously fired by Trump in March last year, was asked about the scandal in an interview with the PBS Newshour broadcast Monday.

Without using Trump's name or going into details of the incident, Tillerson said: "Clearly, asking for personal favors and using United States assets as collateral is wrong."

"So if you're seeking some personal gain and you're using, whether it's American foreign aid, American weapons or American influence, that's wrong, and I think everyone understands that," he said.

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