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How the rise of white nationalism is being shaped by population changes in rural America

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America has been racked by an ugly culture war that was in the makings long before the election of President Donald Trump. That culture war has given rise to extreme right-wing populism, anti-immigrant hysteria, and often outright white nationalist demonstrations — and much of it is concentrated in rural areas. But how did this come about?

Demographic data analyzed by Axios suggests the trends that have spooked segments of the country to racist political causes — and suggests why these causes are ultimately doomed in the long run.

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Nationally, racial and ethnic minorities are becoming a larger and larger share of the population, with white people projected to lose the majority within 20 years. Regionally, Hispanics have surged 18.6 percent since 2010, mostly concentrated in the Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, California, and South Florida. African-Americans, meanwhile, grew 27.4 percent, mostly throughout the Old South “Black Belt” region.

What is particularly striking in the data is that the Midwest has seen some growth of minorities, mainly the Asian American and Native American population, but considerably less so than the Sun Belt states. Moreover, whereas the growth in the Midwest is largely concentrated in cities and suburbs, minority populations in the Sun Belt have grown in rural areas.

All of this could explain why the Midwest has been trending redder as the Sun Belt has trended bluer. White baby boomers in the region are seeing their populations declining while receiving less cultural exposure to minority groups.

But as Axios notes, the same factors driving this phenomenon could ultimately cause it to collapse.

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“Baby boomers grew up in an era where America was mostly white, and the biggest racial minority was African Americans who were still mostly segregated,” said the Brookings Institution’s Bill Frey. “Millennials and post-millennials are much more open to diversity and integration.” And eventually, their political power will become dominant.


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3 out of 9 companies in one state have filed for bankruptcy since Trump promised to ‘bring back coal’

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President Donald Trump's promises to coal miners have fallen along with his other broken campaign promises. Another state is facing the harsh reality that Trump is not riding in on a white horse to save them.

According to Axios, three out of the nine coal companies in the Powder River Basin in northeastern Wyoming have filed for bankruptcy and another two companies are consolidating. Kentucky coal miners have been protesting Blackjewl, which filed for bankruptcy in July, withdrawing payroll dollars from miners' accounts. Little has been heard about the Wyoming workers as those companies crumble, however.

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Why you should sell your house now — and not wait for the climate to change

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Cities across the United States are already seeing the impacts of climate change. Sea levels are on the rise in Miami, Florida, where ocean waters creep into the streets, even when it isn't raining. Massive wildfires have taken out whole neighborhoods in California and in Alaska, about 2.5 million acres have burned since July 3. Wildfires there are getting worse, according to experts.

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GOP lawmakers working behind the scenes with Democrats to curb Trump’s tariff madness

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According to a report from Wall Street Journal, Republican lawmakers are working behind the scenes to rein in Donald Trump's penchant for declaring tariffs willy-nilly depending on how he feels about other countries and their leaders at any given time.

As the president trade war rages on -- impacting manufacturers, farmers and consumers alike -- Republicans looking at the 2020 election are desperate to turn around a U.S. economy that looks headed for a recession.

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