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State by state: Here are the top 5 states that support impeaching Trump and the top 5 that oppose it

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After having the last two Republican presidents installed by the Electoral College despite both having lost the popular vote by a substantial margin, Americans are starting to understand that national polls – and the national vote – aren’t the best measure of what the future holds. The polls weren’t wrong – Hillary Clinton did, in fact, beat Donald Trump, and by almost 3 million votes – but 77,000 or so people across three states had a different opinion, and they literally decided the election.

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So it’s a very good idea to look at public opinion state by state, at least until the Electoral College is no more.

The folks at Civiqs are doing just that. They’ve been measuring public opinion, state by state, on impeaching President Trump since June of 2018. There are some interesting – and alarming – insights.

Overall (yes, not important, but good to know as a baseline) 52% of Americans support impeaching trump, according to Civiqs’ latest report, and 45% oppose impeaching him.

The majority of Americans 18-49 support impeachment, the majority of those 50 and older do not.

58% of women support impeaching Trump, but 52% of men don’t.

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54% of whites oppose impeachment. 87% of Blacks, and 70% of Hispanics and Latinos support impeachment.

So, by state?

Here are the top five (six, actually, due to a tie) states that support impeaching President Trump:

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Hawaii (71%), Vermont (68%), Massachusetts (66%), California (64%), and Rhode Island and Washington (tied at 63%).

And the top 5 states that oppose impeaching President Trump:

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Wyoming (69%), West Virginia (68%), Oklahoma (65%), and Arkansas and North Dakota  (tied at 62%).

If you’re wondering how accurate this report is, Civiqs got 156,788 responses, which is a huge sample size.

 


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