Quantcast
Connect with us

Warren criticized for conciliatory remarks on post-coup Bolivia

Published

on

Top-tier 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren is under fire from progressives and Indigenous activists for her comments Monday about the recent coup in Bolivia—remarks her critics called too conciliatory to the right-wing un-elected government that seized power after President Evo Morales was forced to resign and flee the country.

“The Bolivian people deserve free and fair elections, as soon as possible,” Warren tweeted Monday afternoon. “Bolivia’s interim leadership must limit itself to preparing for an early, legitimate election. Bolivia’s security forces must protect demonstrators, not commit violence against them.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“Sometimes silence is better,” replied journalist Katie Halper.

“Please get a better foreign policy advisor and condemn the coup,” said attorney Eva Golinger.

The coup on November 10 resulted in the democratically-elected Morales being forced to resign from office. Morales fled Bolivia for Mexico days later after Sen. Jeanine Añez, a right-wing Christian extremist, unilaterally declared herself president.

Jacobin‘s Luke Savage pointed out that Warren’s statement appeared to be an attempt to downplay the violence of the coup and reframe the conflict as a purely political conflict.

“This isn’t an issue of process,” said Savage. “A right wing military coup deposed Bolivia’s sitting president and the U.S.A. supported it.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Chief among progressive criticiques of Warren’s statement were the Massachusetts’ senator’s apparent endorsement of the legitimacy of the coup government.

“Maybe it’s just me, but if you’re going to call yourself a progressive who stands up for the little guy you might want to start calling a right wing coup that’s resulted in the curbing of democratic freedoms and onslaught of violence… well, a right wing coup,” tweeted Al Jazeera host Sana Saeed. “And condemn it.”

Protests against Añez’s government have spread across Boliva over the past week. On Friday, as Common Dreams reported, police and military forces killed nine Indigenous protesters in the city of Sacaba, near Cochabamba.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), a fellow frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination, on Monday evening tweeted once again his condemnation of what he has consistently called a coup and shared a video of the violence in Cochabamba.

“I oppose the intervention of Bolivia’s security forces in the democratic process and their repression of Indigenous protesters,” said Sanders. “When the military intervened and asked President Evo Morales to leave, in my view, that’s called a coup.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“Bolivia highlights another stark contrast with Sanders that can’t be obscured with semantics,” tweeted journalist and media critic Adam Johnson. “Sanders firmly calls what happened a coup, Warren gives us process handwringing.”

In response to Warren’s statement, civil rights activist Kade Crockford tweeted: “This has me seriously reconsidering my support for Warren over Sanders.”

The Intercept‘s Ryan Grim, in a tweet, called out Warren’s refusal to call Añez’s seizure of power a coup.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The ‘interim leadership’ has already threatened to arrest elected lawmakers in Morales’ party for sedition,” said Grim, “while killing people in the streets.”

Texas Democrat Sema Hernandez, who is Indigenous, said on Twitter that she found Warren’s statements on the coup and the violence unaccetable.

“I condemn Elizabeth Warren for taking this position on the Bolivia coup,” said Hernandez. “The interim leadership is ethnically cleansing Bolivia’s indigenous population and declaring Bolivia a Christian nation.”

In the Now journalist Rania Khalek, in a withering criticism of Warren’s position, referred to the Massachusetts senator’s longstanding controversial claim of Cherokee heritage.

ADVERTISEMENT

“This is a pathetic statement in light of a U.S. backed coup,” said Khalek. “And it’s coming from a person who claimed to be Indigenous. But now she says nothing in defense of actual Indigenous people.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

How the ‘liberal’ media put Trump in the White House

Published

on

The American mainstream news media made many mistakes in its coverage of the 2016 presidential election.It treated Donald Trump as a harmless curiosity because he was a reality TV show star and professional (alleged) billionaire.

Hillary Clinton’s shortcomings — both real and perceived — were amplified. Trump’s were downplayed if not largely ignored.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Jared Kushner is ‘officially overseeing’ Trump’s 2020 campaign ‘from his seat in the West Wing’: NY Times

Published

on

The administration of President Donald Trump has had multiple scandals for using federal government resources to aid his 2020 re-election campaign, but senior White House advisor Jared Kushner is his de facto campaign manager, The New York Times reported Thursday.

"Hours before the House Judiciary Committee was set to take a historic vote to push President Trump to the brink of impeachment, campaign officials gathered across the Potomac River for a state-of-the-race briefing in which they described how the Republican Party had been transformed into the “beer and bluejeans party” crafted in Mr. Trump’s image," the newspaper reported, despite the fact Trump claims he does not drink beer and is not known for wearing anything other than suits and golf attire.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Republicans expect impeachment to cost the GOP seats in 2020: ‘Cult members can’t see past the Kool-Aid’

Published

on

As the GOP strategy for the impeachment of President Donald Trump seems to be a combination of shouting and stubbornly denying facts, even some Republicans are worried that ignoring reality could have historic implications.

In 1974, Republicans suffered an epic defeat following the impeachment inquiry that resulted in the resignation of GOP President Richard Nixon.

"Nearly a half-century ago, [GOP House Judiciary Committee members] who protected then-President Richard Nixon suffered a hefty price for it just months later in the 1974 midterm elections: Five of the 10 members who voted against all three articles of impeachment saw their seats flip to Democrats. Four were defeated outright. The fifth retired, and the Republican hoping to succeed him lost," HuffPost reported Thursday. "In contrast, House Republicans as a whole lost only 25% of their seats that November ? still a staggering loss rate, but only half of that suffered by members of the Judiciary Committee."

Continue Reading