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Mitch McConnell’s multitude of political sins revealed in distressing profile

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Mitch McConnell finally has the power he’s longed for since he was a 22-year-old intern for Sen. John Sherman, but his ruthless march to become Senate majority leader has seen him abandon almost all of his stated principles — and earned him a lot of enemies.

The Kentucky Republican has been unpopular in his home state for years, but last summer saw his approval rating plunge to 18 percent after MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough tarred and feathered him with the nickname “Moscow Mitch,” and he’s increasingly seen as “the man who sold America,” reported Rolling Stone.

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“For so many years, McConnell has seemed maddeningly invincible,” wrote Bob Moser in a lengthy magazine profile. “But now, just a few years after achieving his lifelong goal of becoming Senate majority leader, it appears that every political sin the man has committed on his relentless march to power is coming back to haunt him at once.”

“He has welcomed infamy, and now it has arrived on its own terms, bringing with it a previously unthinkable possibility,” he added. “Could 40 years’ worth of devil’s bargains finally be catching up with Mitch McConnell?”

Moser catalogs the Senate majority leader’s political sins, dating back to his swiftly broken campaign promises to back abortion and collective bargaining rights in a 1977 race for Jefferson County judge executive, up to the shady deal earlier this year to lift sanctions on a Russian oligarch whose company Rusal announced a $200 million investment in Kentucky.

“For all the damage he’s inflicted on American democracy, for all the political corpses he’s left in his wake, Mitch McConnell has never betrayed an ounce of shame. To the contrary, like the president he now so faithfully serves, McConnell has always exuded a sense of pride in the lengths to which he’s gone to achieve his ambitions and infuriate his enemies.”

But those machinations seem to be wearing thin with voters, who don’t see how McConnell’s power has translated to any meaningful benefits for their state.

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“When I was first able to vote, in 1996, I voted for Mitch,” said Jen Thompson, a 47-year-old artist and farmer from Paducah. “He was already getting powerful in Washington, and I bought into the idea that he could do a lot of good for us.”

“But eventually it dawned on me, like a lot of people, this guy really doesn’t give a crap about us,” she added. “He’s all about stockpiling his own squirrel-nut factory for his winter. Public records are public records, and you can see how his trajectory has gone toward wealth. Back home, I’m still making the same amount of money I was making! I think he’s got a real good chance of being booted this time.”

Thompson had come to the annual Fancy Farm picnic where Kentucky politicians hobnob with voters, lob insults at their opponents and brush back hecklers — who drowned out an ashen McConnell with jeers and insults.

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“I’d say the crowd is pretty evenly divided the way Kentucky is,” said Bennie J. Smith, a civil-rights activist and jazz musician running a long-shot Democratic campaign against McConnell. “Some don’t like him, and some hate him.”


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GOP senators will ignore Bolton bombshell because they ‘just want this over’: ex-White House official

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Appearing on CNN's "New Day," in the wake of the New York Times bombshell revelation that former national security adviser John Bolton book blows up the central impeachment defense put forward by Donald Trump's lawyers, former White House press secretary Joe Lockhart said it may not be enough to persuade Senate Republicans to allow witnesses.

According to the Times, "President Trump directly tied the withholding of almost $400 million in American security aid to investigations that he sought from Ukrainian officials, according to an unpublished manuscript of a book that John R. Bolton, Mr. Trump’s former national security adviser, wrote about his time in the White House. The firsthand account of the link between the aid and investigations, which is based on meetings and conversations Mr. Bolton had with Mr. Trump, undercuts a key component of the president’s impeachment defense."

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Fox News’ Geraldo Rivera attacks former White House press secretary on Twitter as ‘old douche’

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In a bizarre moment, Sunday evening politics turned into a war of words in President Donald Trump's Twitter comments.

Fox News commentator Geraldo Rivera responded to former press secretary Joe Lockhart, who had replied to one of the tweets Trump retweeted from Rivera.

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Lockhart responded to the comment by mocking the Fox News host, saying that he was only making the comment to help get his contract renewed.

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‘Now we see why’ Trump blocked Bolton from testifying — and Republicans are barring witnesses: Adam Schiff

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House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) is one of the handful of members of Congress who have served as managers for President Donald Trump's impeachment trial. He has not only navigated the past week of the trial, but he conducted the first major hearing.

After the New York Times revealed key facts from former national security adviser John Bolton's upcoming book, Schiff said that it was clear the information Bolton has is why Trump blocked him from testifying.

“I think you have to for the sake of the office,” Trump told Fox News’s Laura Ingraham when she asked if he would block Bolton.

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