Quantcast
Connect with us

US Supreme Court lets stand Kentucky law with abortion restrictions

Published

on

The US Supreme Court on Monday let stand a Kentucky law that requires doctors to make patients seeking an abortion look at fetal images taken by echocardiogram and to listen to their heartbeat.

Without explanation, as is customary, the top US court refused to hear a suit challenging the state law, which was passed in 2017.

The law requires doctors to show patients echocardiogram images of the fetus and describe to them its size and organs and have them listen to its heartbeat if it is detectable, even if the patient objects.

ADVERTISEMENT

Kentucky’s authorities justified the measure as needed to obtain the patient’s “informed consent” before proceeding with an abortion.

In a brief, the only clinic that practices abortions in Kentucky argued that the restrictions were inappropriate.

“There is no area of medicine that considers the forced display and description of diagnostic images over the patient’s objection or against their will to be appropriate or part of informed consent,” it said.

The American Civil Liberties Union, which supports the clinic, said it was “extremely disappointed that the Supreme Court will allow this blatant violation of the First Amendment and fundamental medical ethics to stand.”

“By refusing to review the Sixth Circuit’s ruling, the Supreme Court has rubber-stamped extreme political interference in the doctor-patient relationship,” said Alexa Kolbi-Molinas, senior staff attorney at the ACLU’s Reproductive Freedom Project.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Supreme Court legalized the right to abortion in 1973, but opposition to it remains strong in parts of American society, particularly in the so-called Bible Belt states of the South and mid-section of the country.

US President Donald Trump, who campaigned on a pledge to appoint only opponents of abortion to the Supreme Court, has so far named two of the court’s nine justices.

Their arrival has galvanized abortion opponents who are counting on the new justices to overturn the 1973 decision, or at least allow states to restrict access to the procedure.

ADVERTISEMENT

The first big test will occur in March, when the court examines a Louisiana law whose restrictions on abortion are similar to those of a Texas law that the court struck down nearly four years ago.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Can’t do what you need to do in a public toilet? You’re not alone – and there’s help

Published

on

Most of us don’t give much thought to going to the toilet. We go when we need to go.

But for a small minority of people, the act of urinating or defecating can be a major source of anxiety – especially when public restrooms are the only facilities available.

Paruresis (shy bladder) and parcopresis (shy bowel) are little known mental health conditions, yet they can significantly compromise a person’s quality of life.

We don’t know how many people have shy bowel, but research has estimated around 2.8%-16.4% of the population are affected by shy bladder. The condition is more common in males.

Continue Reading

Facebook

Peru to install cameras at Machu Picchu after damage

Published

on

Peru is installing security cameras at its world renowned Machu Picchu site after it was damaged earlier this month by foreign tourists, authorities said Tuesday.

"We are going to strengthen security at Machu Picchu by installing high-tech cameras," Jose Bastante, head of the archeological park, told AFP.

Bastante said 18 cameras will be located at three strategic points of the citadel as well as access points from surrounding mountains.

"This will allow us to better control visitors and avoid any action or infraction to the regulations, also any type of risk," he said, adding that drones were also being used for security.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

‘They’re not dead’: Falling iguana alert in Florida amid cold snap

Published

on

Green iguanas are considered a nuisance in Florida, where they are blamed for causing considerable damage to everything from seawalls to sidewalks -- not to mention menacing endangered butterflies and snails.

But the invasive species may have met their match in an unusual cold snap which sent thermometers plummeting in Florida, rendering the cold-blooded reptiles paralyzed.

"This isn't something we usually forecast, but don't be surprised if you see Iguanas falling from the trees tonight as lows drop into the 30s and 40s. Brrrr," tweeted the National Weather Service in Miami. That is between -1 and 4 degrees Celsius.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image